Displaying items by tag: Natural disasters

2015 Theme: Opportunity, Mobility and Sustainability: The Humanitarian Aid and Development Perspectives Held under the patronage of H.H. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President, Prime Minister of United Arab Emirates, Ruler of Dubai, supported by Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Est., the United Nations, the UAE Red Crescent Authority, International Humanitarian City, Dubai Cares and the Organisation of Islamic Conference. INDEX will host the 12th Dubai International Humanitarian Aid & Development Conference & Exhibition – DIHAD – 2015. This unique event will take place from the 24 – 26 March 2015 at the Dubai International Convention &…
Since its creation in 1993, the UK meidical NGO Merlin has provided health care in disaster and conflict-affected areas and made a significant contribution to the management of diseases such as TB, Lassa Fever and Malaria. In July 2013 Merlin decided to join forces with Save the Children and the transition process is now very nearly complete. To ensure that Merlin's story is recorded and its achievements and contributions to the humanitarian and health sectors are properly recognised and understood, Merlin has commissioned 'A History of Merlin' that will be published in 2015. The intention is to tell the story…
Allegations that International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) are not accountable to the populations they assist have followed several humanitarian operations, and the 2010 Haiti Earthquake was no exception. In response, initiatives such as the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership guided agencies’ efforts to become more accountable. Results of mechanisms implemented by two INGOs showed that although conditions were created for people to raise concerns, the ability of Haitians to obtain a response from the agencies was limited. The research found that while in principle agencies have the best interests of affected populations as their aim, fragmentation and power asymmetries within the humanitarian sector…
Leadership is a vital element in humanitarian operations. Good leadership can lead to more effective humanitarian response while poor leadership can create delays, confusion, and missed opportunities.   Both agencies and their staff in the field are well aware of this. When polled for ALNAP’s 2012 State of the Humanitarian System report they singled out poor leadership as the greatest constraint to the performance of humanitarian operations.   But what does good leadership look like? And how can we promote it? The humanitarian sector has often assumed that good leadership is all about ensuring that we have talented individual ‘leaders’…
Environment. While for many this word may conjure visions of household recycling or polar bears, the reality is that people rely on the environment for everything. At the most fundamental level, for our lives. No one can live for long without clean air, clean water and food. Many of us also depend on the environment for livelihoods, particularly in developing countries where, according to the World Bank, a quarter of total wealth comes from natural capital.[1] For example, in India alone, some 50 million people are directly dependent on forests for their survival. The environment is a humanitarian issue and…
How can we best engage city dwellers in emergency response? The density and diversity of urban environments pose challenges for humanitarians looking to identify representative community members and engage crises-affected people effectively. The scale of the urban landscape means more affected people as well as greater variety in stakeholders. Following a panel at the ALNAP Annual Meeting on 11 March chaired by Groupe URD featuring presentations from British Red Cross, Mukuru Slums Development Projects and IFRC as well as Q&A (available to view at http://www.alnap.org/resource/10793.aspx), this webinar will bring together a panel of operationally experienced humanitarians to discuss the challenges…
Out of 21 cities worldwide that lie in similar seismic zones, Kathmandu, Nepal is at the highest risk in terms of impact on people. Taking the Kathmandu Valley as a case study, this report presents a series of lessons on good practice and innovative approaches for urban risk management, preparedness and response programmes. The report, developed in partnership with Groupe URD, forms part of a wider learning project that is helping to inform the programmes and responses, training, technical guidelines, approaches and tools of the British Red Cross and its partners. The Kathmandu-specific and general learning points presented in the…
Monday 17 February 2014 Venue: Royal Society Of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, LONDON, W1G 0AE In early November Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines with wind speeds of up to 196mph, killing and injuring thousands and destroying homes and infrastructure. The resulting devastation and human suffering caught the attention of the world and many countries, the United Kingdom included, sent volunteers to assist the affected communities. What those volunteers experienced was challenging, emotive and sometimes quite unexpected. This meeting aims to highlight the diverse work of some of the agencies involved and share the lessons learned for disaster response in the…
Evidence Aid has been working with Virginia Murray and others in Public Health England, and elsewhere, to prepare focused Evidence Aid resources (relevant scientific evidence) for the Philippines, and have started a dedicated webpage which can be accessed at: http://www.evidenceaid.org/resources-following-typhoon-haiyan-in-the-philippines/ You will find studies on the following: Infectious Diseases & Flooding Disaster Evacuation & Medication Flooding & Mental Health Secondary Stressors and Extreme events and Disasters Disaster Risk Management for Health   Other useful items include: Needs assessment: Process, Methodologies and Tools Fact Sheets: Disaster Risk Management for Health   If you (or others in your team) are in the…
Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) struck Southeast Asia in early November 2013, with especially damaging consequences for large swathes of the Philippines. It was one of the deadliest typhoons on record, killing almost 6,000 people, though the final death toll is still being determined. Adding to the country's woes, just a few weeks early in mid-October a 7.2 magnitude earthquake shook the island province of Central Visayas killing and injuring hundreds with another 300,000 people displaced. Researchers associated with the Igarapé Institute and the Enstiti Travay Sosyal ak Syans Sosyal (Institute of Social Work and Social Science) were based in Central Visayas…
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