Displaying items by tag: UN

Twenty years ago in the first week of April, an ODI colleague and I were in Brussels to launch a new network for relief workers (what later became the Humanitarian Practice Network). It was there we learnt that ten Belgian paratroopers forming part of the United Nations (UN) peacekeeping force in Rwanda had been killed trying to protect the Rwandan Prime Minister. The Prime Minister had also been killed. This came just one day after the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi had both been killed when their aircraft crashed on its approach to Kigali. It later emerged that the plane…
Convened by Dr Cathryn Costello, in association with the Oxford Human Rights Hub   5pm, every Wednesday, Seminar Room 1 Oxford Department of International Development 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB   22 Jan At the end of the rainbow: where next for the LGBTI refugee? S. Chelvan (No5 Chambers)   29 Jan Turning wrongful convictions into rights? Asylum seekers and the criminal law Dr Ana Aliverti (Warwick School of Law)   5 Feb The child in international refugee law Jason Pobjoy (Blackstone Chambers)   12 Feb Three asylum paradigms Jean-François Durieux (RSC and the Graduate Institute, Geneva)   19…
In the first week of March 2011, a group of schoolboys in the rural Syrian village of Dara’a were imprisoned for graffiti, after spray-painting the walls of a school with a common slogan of the Arab uprisings, ‘The people want to topple the regime’.[1] This event sparked anti-government demonstrations that would soon spread throughout the country. The ensuing conflict between government and rebel forces, which is now in its third year, has forced over two million Syrians to seek refuge abroad, principally in the neighbouring countries of Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq, and further afield in Egypt. The relentless pace…
A political or military solution to stop the carnage in Syria seems as remote as ever. The war seems only to bring even worse depths of human suffering and diplomatic impotence. Syrian civilians are in a state, not just of terror, but of horror – hostages in a geopolitical, ideological and sectarian catastrophe. On the face of it, getting humanitarian assistance to the millions affected should be easier to deal with than the political and military mess. In the space of two years, a major relief operation within Syria has indeed come to life despite the extreme circumstances. But these…
The refugee camp, positioned between formality and informality, mobility and immobility, permanence and impermanence, is a space of paradox. In the process of contextualising this paradox, the academic literature often juxtaposes the 'camp (as exception) and the city (as norm) in contradiction with one another' (Sanyal 2010:879). As these tent cities develop into urban environments, there is a need to evaluate the urbanity of the camp space by considering the ways in which refugee spaces come to take on a hybrid nature where 'refugeeness and agency have worked simultaneously to create "spaces of exception" that are able to transgress the…
Drawing from preliminary fieldwork undertaken between February and March 2013, this working paper presents provisional findings regarding refugees’ livelihoods and interactions with the private sector and markets in Kampala, Nakivale and Kyangwali refugee settlements in Uganda. The paper sketches out the diversity of livelihoods strategies employed by the refugees, and reveals their different patterns of engagement with local and national markets. In particular, the paper shows that refugees’ economic activities at all three sites are deeply nested in the multiple layers of the host economies. These initial observations, furthermore, illustrate the vital role played by personal and community social networks…
Professor Yakin Ertürk will present this year's Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture:  'Refugee rights: beyond the 1951 Convention'  The Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture is named in honour of Barbara Harrell-Bond, Founding Director of the Refugee Studies Centre. Yakin Ertürk (Turkey) received a PhD in Development Sociology from Cornell University in 1980. She served as a faculty member at the Department of Sociology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, from September 1986 to October 2010. In addition to her academic career, she has worked for various national and international agencies on rural development and women in development, and she has provided training to public and…
Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminar Series:  'Refugees within the politics of mobility'  Convenors: Dr Alexander Betts and Dr Matthew J Gibney  Wednesdays at 17:00 from 16 October - 4 December 2013.  Please see the attached schedule for more details.     
Humanitarian access negotiations with Hamas in the Gaza Strip highlight the many challenges humanitarians encounter when engaging with non-state actors. After winning the Palestinian Authority (PA) parliamentary elections in 2006, Hamas began transitioning from an Islamic charitable/militant organisation to a party responsible for state institutions and the provision of public services. Yet Hamas remains in many ways a nonstate actor; those running its ministries are guided by its senior leadership in Qatar and Egypt, have little control over its paramilitary branch, the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades, and are suspicious of Western aid organisations’ potential ‘collaboration’ with Israeli and other intelligence…
Andrew Harper has been working with refugees since the 1990's when he worked in Turkey during the first gulf war for UNHCR. Currently he is UNHCR Country Representative in Jordan and responsible for more than half a million Syrian refugees who have fled the war in their country. What is UNHCR's role in Jordan? UNHCR's role is to ensure the necessary protection and assistance is being provided to the refugees obviously, in support of the government in the host communities. That's the main objective- to support the government to alleviate the pressure on it from what is an extremely challenging situation,…
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