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MESSAGE FROM THE CO-CHAIRS OF THE IASC TASK TEAM ON REVITALIZING PRINCIPLED HUMANITARIAN ACTION IASC Task Team on Revitalizing Principled Humanitarian Action would like to invite you to participate in the "Survey to review the impact of UN Integration on humanitarian action", as well as to circulate the link to the survey and encourage wide participation by humanitarian colleagues. The survey can be found here: https://www.research.net/s/IASCsurvey The IASC is undertaking this important survey to review the impact of UN integration on humanitarian action. Participation is vital to inform the humanitarian community of recent experience and observations, including the positive and…
In 1991, the UN General Assembly established the position of Emergency Relief Coordinator (ERC) to pull together international efforts in response to major humanitarian emergencies all over the world. In keeping with the principle of International Humanitarian Law that relief operations should be conducted "in a humanitarian and impartial manner", those appointed to fill the post of ERC between 1992 and 2006 came from Brazil, Denmark, Japan, Norway and Sweden. In 2007, however, the present Secretary-General, Ban ki-moon, appointed British diplomat Sir John Holmes to the post and in 2010, he was succeeded by another British nominee, the former minister…
This paper puts forward the argument that substantive attention to the phenomenon of ‘trust’ constitutes a surprising missing chapter in contemporary repatriation policy and theory. In particular, the paper highlights the need for repatriation theorists and policy-makers to foreground trust relations between refugees and their states of origin in dominant frameworks. It argues that emphasis on these refugee-state trust relations presents a logical development, both of contemporary theory on the political content of repatriation and of due consideration of the formidable barrier to repatriation posed by refugees’ distrust of their state of origin. The paper puts forward a trust-based lens,…
2015 Theme: Opportunity, Mobility and Sustainability: The Humanitarian Aid and Development Perspectives Held under the patronage of H.H. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President, Prime Minister of United Arab Emirates, Ruler of Dubai, supported by Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Est., the United Nations, the UAE Red Crescent Authority, International Humanitarian City, Dubai Cares and the Organisation of Islamic Conference. INDEX will host the 12th Dubai International Humanitarian Aid & Development Conference & Exhibition – DIHAD – 2015. This unique event will take place from the 24 – 26 March 2015 at the Dubai International Convention &…
The editors and contributors of this volume are to be congratulated on a practical text that pushes forwards our knowledge and understanding of the virtual space that now surrounds humanitarian operations, and which can have such a physical impact upon them. I encourage you to read it. The articles that follow have certainly brought me up to speed. Hugo Slim – Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC), University of Oxford. [Extract from the foreword ofCommunications Technology and Humanitarian Delivery: Challenges and Opportunities for Security Risk Management.] The articles contained in this publication are dispatches…
Launch of the book ‘Aid in Danger’ - Tuesday 19 August, ODI   Aid in danger: Violence against aid workers and the future of humanitarianism   19 August 2014, 14:00-15:30 - Overseas Development Institute (ODI), 203 Blackfriars Rd, SE1 8NJ London To register for this event and attend either in person or online, please follow this link: http://www.odi.org/events/3992-aid-danger-violence-against-aid-workers-future-humanitarianism   EISF and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) are pleased to invite you to the launch of 'Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism' by Larissa Fast—a hard look at violent attacks against aid workers on the frontlines of humanitarian crises. Based on…
The survey will contribute to the State of the Humanitarian System review, which is commissioned by ALNAP. Conducted every three years, the review is a unique opportunity to take stock of the performance of the humanitarian system as a whole. It seeks to measure how well humanitarian actors are performing in their core tasks of saving lives and alleviating human suffering. To take the survey, click on the link that is relevant for you: International and national aid practitioners’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي Host government representatives’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي    
Effective leadership requires not only the right people in the right place, but also an environment that enables leaders to lead. This is particularly relevant for Humanitarian Coordinators, who lack formal authority over their 'followers', and therefore rely heavily on a conducive environment in order to deliver on their mandate.[1] In the past six years significant progress has been made in improving the performance of Coordinators. It is now time to broaden our focus to the environment where these leaders are placed: the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) and, more broadly, the UN system. Strengthening Humanitarian Coordinators: we've come a long…
In the words of UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Antonio Guterres, we face ‘the most serious refugee crisis for 20 years’. Recent displacement from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan, and Somalia has increased the number of refugees in the world to 15.4 million. Significantly, some 10.2 million of these people are in protracted refugee situations. In other words, they have been in limbo for at least 5 years, with an average length of stay in exile of nearly 20 years. Rather than transitioning from emergency relief to long-term reintegration, displaced populations too often get trapped within the system. Published on…
Environment. While for many this word may conjure visions of household recycling or polar bears, the reality is that people rely on the environment for everything. At the most fundamental level, for our lives. No one can live for long without clean air, clean water and food. Many of us also depend on the environment for livelihoods, particularly in developing countries where, according to the World Bank, a quarter of total wealth comes from natural capital.[1] For example, in India alone, some 50 million people are directly dependent on forests for their survival. The environment is a humanitarian issue and…
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