Displaying items by tag: Security

In 2001–2002, Southern Africa experienced its worst food crisis since 1992. Most assessments have understood this crisis to be as much a crisis of livelihoods, or of development in general, as a simple food shock. In the decade leading up to the crisis, increasing vulnerability to the changing political and socio-economic environment was not adequately understood or addressed. This meant that a modest external threat, such as erratic rainfall, was all that was required to trigger widespread suffering. Numerous studies have since revealed the complexity of the crisis, which is now recognised as having both acute and chronic dimensions. In…
The book highlights the common features of safety and security that apply or could apply to humanitarian workers working in conflict areas. It explains the dangers volunteers might face and some of the likely threats to their work. It gives advice on issues of personal security, use of common sense and judgement in the field. It reflects the ever-changing conflict environment in which humanitarians have to work. It deals with new threats such as nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, and encompasses wider issues such as protection of humanitarian volunteers under international law and practical life. Click here for a copy…
The pages of Humanitarian Exchange and Disasters bear witness to the fact that the interaction between international military forces and aid workers has become a subject of great fascination. Amid the heated discussions of the issue, however, little attention has been paid to how local communities and vulnerable populations perceive their own security and survival prospects. These perceptions are the subject of recently concluded research contrasting local views of peace and security with the views of foreign troops and aid agencies. This article highlights the findings of the research, examines its reception to date and explores its implications for future…
Before the International Criminal Court (ICC) became a reality in 2002, most humanitarian workers thought it was a good thing. Many humanitarian organisations called for an end to the impunity enjoyed by the people who cause the misery that humanitarian workers try to alleviate, and some joined formal campaigns for the establishment of the ICC. There was what seemed an obvious commonality of interest between those campaigning for justice and those trying to supply food, shelter and medical care to the victims of violence and armed conflict. The court does indeed have the potential to benefit the people humanitarians try…
The purpose of the meeting was to launch HPN Network Paper no. 52, ‘Interpreting and using mortality data in humanitarian emergencies: A primer for non-epidemiologists’, by Francesco Checchi and Les Roberts. Richard Horton (Editor of the Lancet) chaired the meeting. James Darcy of HPG introduced Francesco Checchi, Joanna Macrae (DFID) and Richard Horton and opened the meeting by pointing out that just over a year ago HPG hosted a presentation by Professor Richard Garfield on excess deaths in Iraq since Operation Enduring Freedom. The debate over excess death in Iraq highlighted the importance for the humanitarian community of understanding mortality…
Humanitarian and development personnel faced an unusual surge in intentional violence and intimidation during 2004. More than 100 UN civilian and NGO personnel were killed in violence around the world between July 2003 and July 2004. Although the absence of reliable data on intentional violence precludes a precise reading of its many dimensions, the consequences of gun violence on the safety and security of relief workers, and on their access to civilians, have been profound. Attesting to the seriousness of this issue, the UN High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change strongly condemned the increasing risks encountered by relief…
This guide gives essential advice and insights to humanitarian practitioners who are involved in providing safety and protecting vulnerable people in war and disaster. It provides a framework for responsibility and action which helps clarify conceptual issues and helps humanitarian field workers position themselves vis-a -vis other actors who have overlapping mandates. A practical schema is also presented which gives practical advice on how to think through the various elements of protection focused programming in four clear steps: assessment; programme design; implementation; monitoring and evaluation. The guide also outlines key principles of best practice for protection-focused humanitarian work. The book…
Levels of chronic malnutrition in Zambia are now among the worst in the world. But it is drought that galvanises attention and informs responses. Drought response will often be necessary, as will the recovery activities that follow. Addressing people’s vulnerability to drought, however, requires a more structural change. One such structural change would be the development of markets for drought-tolerant food crops. In Southern Zambia, this could mean the creation of a market for sorghum. By being able to meet people’s needs both for cash and for food, sorghum, like maize, would become a viable choice for farmers. This would…
The bombing of the UN headquarters in Baghdad in August 2003, and the attack on the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)’s main office in the city the following October, have jolted humanitarian agencies into rethinking and reorganising their security arrangements. Senior officials in the largest agencies speak of a ‘paradigm shift’ in the threats facing humanitarian organisations. For years, and in ever-increasing numbers, Western humanitarian organisations have operated in inhospitable regions. They have faced threats and constraints, and have suffered their fair share of casualties, often as a result of the direct targeting of aid workers. Now, it…
Criminal gun violence poses the greatest security threat to humanitarian and development workers. Armed ‘civilians’ pose a greater risk than insurgents or other combatants, according to the findings of a new study published today. The largest global survey ever of its kind, No Relief: Surveying the Effects of Gun Violence on Humanitarian and Development Personnel, drew on a sample of more than 2,000 relief and development workers from more than 17 international agencies in 96 countries and territories. The study indicates that armed civilians - including criminals and petty thieves – routinely cause security incidents and operation suspensions, preventing access…
Page 10 of 19

Find an Issue

Standard Login