Displaying items by tag: Refugees

Refugee Studies Centre Working Paper 98, by Katherine Rehberg In this paper, the author charts the proliferation of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) programmes in humanitarian settings, and examines the fierce criticisms they have attracted. She uses Vanessa Pupavac's critique of psychosocial programming as constituting 'therapeutic governance', or the or the homogenisation, pathologisation, controlling and depoliticisation of affected communities, to analyse the evolution of these programmes and the debates surrounding them. She then uses this framework to assess current practice in the MHPSS field, as represented by the 2007 Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial…
The conflict in Syria has now been running for 3 years and the humanitarian community is still grappling with one of its biggest ever challenges. HelpAge and Handicap International have recently commissioned a report of the situation of older people and people with disabilities in the Syrian refugee populations in Lebanon and Jordan. Based on sample of 3000 refugees, the report raises major concerns about the way in which humanitarian programmes routinely fail to provide appropriate assistance to this vulnerable group. Some of the issues are raised include inaccurate demographic data; imprecise targeting and registration; and a lack of proper…
Convened by Dr Cathryn Costello, in association with the Oxford Human Rights Hub   5pm, every Wednesday, Seminar Room 1 Oxford Department of International Development 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB   22 Jan At the end of the rainbow: where next for the LGBTI refugee? S. Chelvan (No5 Chambers)   29 Jan Turning wrongful convictions into rights? Asylum seekers and the criminal law Dr Ana Aliverti (Warwick School of Law)   5 Feb The child in international refugee law Jason Pobjoy (Blackstone Chambers)   12 Feb Three asylum paradigms Jean-François Durieux (RSC and the Graduate Institute, Geneva)   19…
Coventry University's Centre for Disaster Management and Hazards Research (CDMHR) are pleased to be hosting the BSHF’s International conference: Looking Back at Reconstruction. Date: 15th - 16th January 2014   A report by a special rapporteur to the United Nations (2011) concluded that reconstruction andrecovery too often focuses on physical structures (houses), where for those affected the recovery of livelihoods, social networks or services are frequently a higher priority. Much of the impact of recovery and reconstruction on people’s livelihoods and resilience can only be truly understood in the longer term. Much of what we think we know about the impact…
In mid-2012, 18 months into the crisis in Syria, most actors agreed that the picture of the humanitarian situation was incoherent and fragmented: displacement flows, the scope and depth of humanitarian needs and the longer-term impact on infrastructure and livelihoods were largely unknown. Much of the problem revolved around the sensitivities associated with gathering and sharing information on the affected population and restricted access to the field. In neighbouring countries hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees, responses diverged and were not based on a coordinated and harmonised needs analysis. The Syria Needs Analysis Project (SNAP) was established in December 2012…
The Syrian civil war has created one of the largest and most intense episodes of human suffering of the early twenty-first century. The uprising against the regime of Bashar al-Assad, which began in March 2011, was widely recognised as part of the ‘Arab Spring’ that saw popular uprisings against dictatorships in Libya, Tunisia and Egypt. When the rebellion began it was limited to relatively small, local skirmishes, but as the fighting has intensified so the numbers of internally displaced people and refugees have risen sharply. Turkey, which shares a 900-kilometre border with Syria, began receiving refugees in small numbers in…
As of September 2013, the crisis in Syria had seen over half a million Syrian refugees flee to Jordan, the vast majority of them (some 400,000) living in rented accommodation in host communities. This influx – equivalent to 5% of Jordan’s population – is placing increasing pressure on service provision and infrastructure, including water. An integrated needs assessment carried out by Oxfam GB in March 2013 found that, while the majority of refugees in host communities can access water through the municipal supply system, the cheapest source of water, this is intermittent and unreliable, and many are forced to buy…
With over two million Syrians seeking safety in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, highly political issues of citizenship, the role of the state and the status and entitlements of non-nationals are pressing questions for a large and rapidly growing number of people. The refugee crisis – one element of a larger displacement crisis affecting nearly 80% of the estimated 8.7m Syrians deemed to be in a situation of humanitarian need[1] – is massive and affects the entire region. It is unlikely that the war in Syria will end soon, and when it does it is implausible that refugees will immediately…
In the first week of March 2011, a group of schoolboys in the rural Syrian village of Dara’a were imprisoned for graffiti, after spray-painting the walls of a school with a common slogan of the Arab uprisings, ‘The people want to topple the regime’.[1] This event sparked anti-government demonstrations that would soon spread throughout the country. The ensuing conflict between government and rebel forces, which is now in its third year, has forced over two million Syrians to seek refuge abroad, principally in the neighbouring countries of Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq, and further afield in Egypt. The relentless pace…
Syria is a highly urbanised country, and the conflict there has had a particularly devastating impact on its cities and towns. Homs, Aleppo, Damascus and many smaller towns have served as battlegrounds for government and rebel offensives, with tragic humanitarian consequences for their inhabitants. The battles for these cities have caused the breakdown of entire urban systems, destroying homes and public services and distorting urban markets and economies. Urban demographics have changed significantly as millions of Syrians have abandoned their homes. People displaced from one city to another or from rural areas to urban environments are forced into close proximity;…
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