Displaying items by tag: Protection

This event launched Network Paper 72: Local to Global Protection in Myanmar, Sudan, South Sudan and Zimbabwe. The Local to Global Protection Project (L2GP) is an initiative to document and promote local perspectives on protection in major humanitarian crises. Based on research in Myanmar, Sudan, South Sudan and Zimbabwe, L2GP explores how people living in areas affected by natural disaster and armed conflict understand ‘protection’ – what they value, and how they go about protecting themselves, their families and their communities. The research also examines how people view the roles of others, including the state, non-state actors, community-based organisations and…
This event launches the Network Paper 72, Local to Global Protection in Myanmar, Sudan, South Sudan and Zimbabwe.  The Local to Global Protection Project (L2GP) is an initiative to document and promote local perspectives on protection in major humanitarian crises. Based on research in Myanmar, Sudan, South Sudan and Zimbabwe, L2GP explores how people living in areas affected by natural disaster and armed conflict understand ‘protection’ – what they value, and how they go about protecting themselves, their families and their communities. The research also examines how people view the roles of others, including the state, non-state actors, community-based organisations…
This Network Paper presents the findings of five community-based studies on self- protection in Myanmar (Burma), Sudan, South Sudan and Zimbabwe. The studies demonstrate how vulnerable people take the lead in activities to protect themselves and their communities, and how local understandings of ‘protection’ vary from how the concept is used by international humanitarian agencies. While hugely important for everyday survival, local understandings and self-protection activities are rarely acknowledged or effectively supported by aid agencies. The case studies also illustrate that, while self-protection strategies may be crucial for survival, they are rarely fully adequate. Local agency cannot be regarded as…
Shining the spotlight on humanitarian accountability again is healthy given this month’s New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States with its focus on transparency and ownership of aid, and Busan’s effective development cooperation agenda. The recent HPN debate on accountability left me reflecting on how much focus should be on accountability to - and as defined by - beneficiaries given the concerns about possible over-riding pressures for output-driven results-based aid in the UK, or in other countries. DfID’s humanitarian policy seems to try to balance accountability to taxpayers and to beneficiaries. It also contains a very clear commitment to strengthening…
Humanitarian actors claim adherence to humanitarian principles in order to win the acceptance of local populations, parties to conflict and other stakeholders, and thereby secure access to vulnerable people at risk. In recent years, however, questions have arisen as to whether humanitarian principles are still relevant as a tool for securing access. Using Afghanistan and Pakistan as examples, this article outlines the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)’s approach to strengthening the implementation of acceptance strategies, including by reinforcing adherence to humanitarian principles. Implementing the approach will take time and effort, but with the changing nature of access challenges NRC believes that…
Afghanistan is now in its fourth decade of warfare, making it one of the most protracted conflicts in recent history. The nature of warfare, and related war agendas, have evolved over time and continue to do so in line with changing internal and external political objectives and ground realities. However, the absence of adequate measures to protect civilians has characterised the fighting since the outbreak of armed conflict in 1979. According to an ICRC survey from 2009, almost all Afghans – 96% – have been directly or indirectly affected as a result of the immediate or wider consequences of war;…
In 2010 HelpAge International undertook an analysis of UN Consolidated Appeals (CAPs) and Flash Appeals for 12 emergencies in an effort to understand the degree to which the needs of older people were recognised and addressed in humanitarian programming. The study aimed to ascertain whether levels of humanitarian assistance were commensurate with the numbers of older people and their needs, and therefore whether the principle of impartiality – that humanitarian assistance is provided according to need – is being upheld. Approximately 11% of the world’s population are people over 60 years of age; by 2050 this figure is expected to…
7 December 2010 15:00-17:00 (GMT+00) - Public event, Overseas Development Institute and screened live online Since the publication of the first edition of Good Practice Review 8 on Operational Security Management in Violent Environments a decade ago, the global security environment has changed significantly. New conflict contexts have created new sources of threat to international humanitarian action. Increasing violence against aid workers and their operations, including more kidnappings and lethal attacks, has had serious implications for humanitarian relief work in insecure contexts. Meanwhile, agencies themselves have become much more conscious of the need to provide for the safety and security…
Event report Wendy Fenton, Coordinator , Humanitarian Practice Network welcomed the speakers and attendees and introduced the speakers and discussant. Amany Abouzeid, Human Security Policy Coordinator, ActionAid and co-author of the report then discussed the ideas behind the research. The research for the report followed the first cluster evaluations of the humanitarian assistance delivered after the conflict. ActionAid felt that these cluster evaluations were too mechanical and raised questions about the effectiveness of the humanitarian response. ActionAid felt there was a need to ask questions about humanitarian principles; perceptions of humanitarian assistance; and the global humanitarian project as a whole…
22 October 2010 13:00-15:00 (GMT+01 (BST)) - Public event, Overseas Development Institute and screened live online In the first of three events in the series Stabilisation, development and humanitarian action, this event launches the supplementary Theme Issue of the journal Disasters States of Fragility, considers the implications of stabilisation for international humanitarian action. The guest editors and some of the contributors to the supplementary Theme Issue will present the key findings of the articles, critically assessing the discourses, policies and practices associated with stabilisation. They consider whether stabilisation efforts that combine military, political, development and humanitarian responses have reduced ‘humanitarian…

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