Displaying items by tag: Politics

On 25th April 2014, we will hold a World Café Event at Loughborough University, in room C1.11, beginning at 10.00 am. We want to create a space in which real conversations can be held, in contrast with how we feel regular conferences sometimes stymie exchange by limiting platforms, audiences and knowledge flows. This is why we’re engaging with a combination of The World Café and Open Space methods. In this safe space, we hope to bring together academics with aid and development workers, policy researchers and practitioners, to share experiences and concerns. We think there’s going to be a lot…
For months we’ve had a terribly worthy and earnest consensus about resilience. Differences of opinion, but all prefaced by saying ‘we all’ really agree about what we should be doing, we just have different frameworks for defining it. The ‘we all’ grew – resilience brought together humanitarians and development agencies, then climate change experts, then social protection advocates, and so on… But now we finally have a disagreement about principle, made much more fun because each side has used ‘principled’ as an insult, as if lacking them were a badge of honour in a pragmatic world.   Three MSF authors…
  Applications for the Rift Valley Institute's 2014 field courses are now open and a prospectus is available from the Rift Valley Institute's website. The three courses, on the Horn of Africa, Sudan and South Sudan, and the Great Lakes will take place from May to July in Kenya and Burundi.  Now in their eleventh year, the Rift Valley Institute's three field course offer a unique opportunity to spend an intensive week with an outstanding group of experts and fellow participants, away from routine distractions. Taught by teams of leading regional and international specialists, the courses are open to policy-makers, diplomats, investors, development…
Convened by Dr Cathryn Costello, in association with the Oxford Human Rights Hub   5pm, every Wednesday, Seminar Room 1 Oxford Department of International Development 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB   22 Jan At the end of the rainbow: where next for the LGBTI refugee? S. Chelvan (No5 Chambers)   29 Jan Turning wrongful convictions into rights? Asylum seekers and the criminal law Dr Ana Aliverti (Warwick School of Law)   5 Feb The child in international refugee law Jason Pobjoy (Blackstone Chambers)   12 Feb Three asylum paradigms Jean-François Durieux (RSC and the Graduate Institute, Geneva)   19…
On 2 November, yet more violence broke out in Myanmar's Rakhine state. Two incidents between Muslim Rohingya and Kaman communities and Rakhine Buddhist communities resulted in two deaths and five people wounded, two with such severe injuries that they later died in hospital. There is long-standing tension between ethnic Rakhine people, who make up the majority of the state's population, and Muslims, many of whom are Rohingya and regarded by the authorities as illegal immigrants. After receiving a phonecall from the leaders of the camp for displaced people where the first incident took place, our medical teams transferred three injured…
With over two million Syrians seeking safety in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, highly political issues of citizenship, the role of the state and the status and entitlements of non-nationals are pressing questions for a large and rapidly growing number of people. The refugee crisis – one element of a larger displacement crisis affecting nearly 80% of the estimated 8.7m Syrians deemed to be in a situation of humanitarian need[1] – is massive and affects the entire region. It is unlikely that the war in Syria will end soon, and when it does it is implausible that refugees will immediately…
Organisers of anti-government protests in Syria were rapidly forced underground by the state’s heavy security response. The networks and techniques that activists had honed to stage demonstrations, evading pervasive government surveillance, interference, detention and assault, were soon put to use in delivering a wide range of humanitarian and social support. This article focuses on the emergence, function and structure of these hybrid networks, particularly in Damascus, taking into consideration the repressive security conditions they operated in, the significance of such networks from the perspective of the regime and the implications for the social fabric of Syria overall. These networks changed…
Islamic Relief is one of the few humanitarian organisations working cross-border to deliver aid in response to the deepening crisis in Syria. The conflict in the country has killed tens of thousands of people, and has driven over 1.5 million across its borders. For those still inside the country, needs are increasingly acute as conditions continue to deteriorate. It is estimated that over six million people are in need inside Syria. Islamic Relief staff have seen for themselves the horrific situation inside Syria. Millions are thought to be in dire need of food, water and sanitation. In the countries that…
A political or military solution to stop the carnage in Syria seems as remote as ever. The war seems only to bring even worse depths of human suffering and diplomatic impotence. Syrian civilians are in a state, not just of terror, but of horror – hostages in a geopolitical, ideological and sectarian catastrophe. On the face of it, getting humanitarian assistance to the millions affected should be easier to deal with than the political and military mess. In the space of two years, a major relief operation within Syria has indeed come to life despite the extreme circumstances. But these…
Young people subject to immigration control in Europe face a range of possible outcomes as they make the transition to ‘adulthood’ at the age of 18. The majority of those institutionalised as unaccompanied minors are denied refugee status or humanitarian protection but are afforded time-limited welfare support and care under provisions of discretionary leave - temporarily tolerated on the cusp of, but not admitted as members of, the national community. Others seek to avoid entering into any relationship with the state and live undocumented.  Irrespective of their points of entry, for most young people, turning 18 marks a significant repositioning…
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