Displaying items by tag: Policy

Twenty years ago in the first week of April, an ODI colleague and I were in Brussels to launch a new network for relief workers (what later became the Humanitarian Practice Network). It was there we learnt that ten Belgian paratroopers forming part of the United Nations (UN) peacekeeping force in Rwanda had been killed trying to protect the Rwandan Prime Minister. The Prime Minister had also been killed. This came just one day after the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi had both been killed when their aircraft crashed on its approach to Kigali. It later emerged that the plane…
Convened by Dr Cathryn Costello, in association with the Oxford Human Rights Hub   5pm, every Wednesday, Seminar Room 1 Oxford Department of International Development 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB   22 Jan At the end of the rainbow: where next for the LGBTI refugee? S. Chelvan (No5 Chambers)   29 Jan Turning wrongful convictions into rights? Asylum seekers and the criminal law Dr Ana Aliverti (Warwick School of Law)   5 Feb The child in international refugee law Jason Pobjoy (Blackstone Chambers)   12 Feb Three asylum paradigms Jean-François Durieux (RSC and the Graduate Institute, Geneva)   19…
Young people subject to immigration control in Europe face a range of possible outcomes as they make the transition to ‘adulthood’ at the age of 18. The majority of those institutionalised as unaccompanied minors are denied refugee status or humanitarian protection but are afforded time-limited welfare support and care under provisions of discretionary leave - temporarily tolerated on the cusp of, but not admitted as members of, the national community. Others seek to avoid entering into any relationship with the state and live undocumented.  Irrespective of their points of entry, for most young people, turning 18 marks a significant repositioning…
The refugee camp, positioned between formality and informality, mobility and immobility, permanence and impermanence, is a space of paradox. In the process of contextualising this paradox, the academic literature often juxtaposes the 'camp (as exception) and the city (as norm) in contradiction with one another' (Sanyal 2010:879). As these tent cities develop into urban environments, there is a need to evaluate the urbanity of the camp space by considering the ways in which refugee spaces come to take on a hybrid nature where 'refugeeness and agency have worked simultaneously to create "spaces of exception" that are able to transgress the…
Professor Yakin Ertürk will present this year's Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture:  'Refugee rights: beyond the 1951 Convention'  The Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture is named in honour of Barbara Harrell-Bond, Founding Director of the Refugee Studies Centre. Yakin Ertürk (Turkey) received a PhD in Development Sociology from Cornell University in 1980. She served as a faculty member at the Department of Sociology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, from September 1986 to October 2010. In addition to her academic career, she has worked for various national and international agencies on rural development and women in development, and she has provided training to public and…
Dates: 9-14th March 2014 Location: Birmingham, UK Course fee: £1100 (includes full board accommodation from the evening of 9th – afternoon of 14th March)   Course description   Strengthening Policy and Practice: meeting the challenges of working in complex environments is designed to draw on the experience and practice of participants, working in development, humanitarian aid or peacebuilding to influence internal policies and programmatic approaches. The course will identify how organisations can strive to balance their organisational mandate with the demands of working in complex and rapidly changing political contexts.   Course aims   The course will enable participants to…
Dates: 13-18th October 2013Location: Birmingham, UKCourse fee: £1100 (includes full board accommodation from the evening of 13th – afternoon of 18th October) Course description Strengthening Policy and Practice: meeting the challenges of working in complex environments is designed to draw on the experience and practice of participants, working in development, humanitarian aid or peacebuilding to influence internal policies and programmatic approaches. The course will identify how organisations can strive to balance their organisational mandate with the demands of working in complex and rapidly changing political contexts.
In recent decades the drylands of the Horn of Africa have become one of the most disaster-prone regions in the world. Drought in particular affects more people, more frequently than any other disaster. Drought periods were not always so disastrous but, combined with the region’s underlying economic, social and environmental vulnerability, the impacts upon dryland inhabitants are extreme. Despite calls for greater investment in preparedness, early response and long-term resiliencebuilding, the 2011 drought crisis in the region illustrates how this has not yet been translated into reality. It is an intuitive belief that investment in early response and resilience-building in…
In July 2011, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Working Group asked the Task Force on Humanitarian Space and Civil–Military Relations to review and update the IASC Non-binding Guidelines on the Use of Military and Armed Escorts for Humanitarian Convoys (2001). The primary concerns that led to the decision to revise the guidelines were the recognition of a growing reliance on armed escorts, the need to synchronise a more robust decision-making process on the use of armed escorts with the new UN Security Management System (SMS) and inconsistencies in the interpretation and application of the out-of-date guidelines. The revised guidelines, which…
With an annual budget of $650 billion and over two million military and civilian personnel, the US Department of Defense is the largest institution in the world. Since September 2001, its primary focus has been the ‘global war on terror’, a war of avowedly unlimited scope and duration. Its critical components include counter-insurgency and stabilisation operations, which have increasingly involved the US military in relief and development activities. NGOs have struggled to develop a unified response to the growing scope and pace of US military involvement in areas normally reserved for civilian leadership and action. Although regular dialogue has been…
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