Displaying items by tag: Personnel management

Health Care in Danger – a global challenge. Every day health workers face one of the most serious and yet unacknowledged humanitarian challenges of our times. Patients and medical workers are attacked, ambulances are obstructed, hospitals are shelled and violent intrusions disrupt the working of clinics, dispensaries and first aid stations. These are daily occurrences which endanger the delivery of effective and impartial health care. There are many challenges and the health care community has a central role in addressing them. A one-day symposium in London on Health Care in Danger, hosted by the International Committee of the Red Cross,…
The 4th edition of The Essential Field Guide to Afghanistan is now in production. Edited by journalists Edward Girardet and William Dowell, this new version includes many of the top writers and experts on Afghanistan: Ahmed Rashid, Christina Lamb, Lyse Doucet, Anthony Fitzherbert, Whitney Azoy, Jolyon Leslie, Norah Niland, Nick Mills, Peter Jouvenal, Ali Wardak, Ewen MacCleod, John Butt, Emanuel Tronc, Shuja Nawaz, Jean McKenzie, Peter Foot and others, plus various contributing Afghan reporters. The fully-revised English language version (we are planning a Dari edition at the request of numerous Afghans) will be available both in print and in electronic…
Partnerships are about relationships. The purpose of partnership is ‘to achieve together what we could not achieve alone’, and working in partnership requires those involved to practice a set of principles that create trust, equity and mutual accountability. In this way, partnership becomes a framework for ‘how we do business together’; it is less determined by the structure of the relationship than by the practice of certain behaviours. What is important is that risks and benefits are shared, and that the partnership is co-created.[1] When organisations work successfully together, change can occur at a faster pace and be more effective…
The Consortium of British Humanitarian Agencies (CBHA) was founded in 2010 in response to a proposal by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) to form a consortium to address some of the challenges facing the humanitarian system, especially around speed, coordination and efficiency. Comprising 15 of the leading UK-based humanitarian agencies, the CBHA’s mandate is to ‘pioneer new approaches to funding and resourcing humanitarian responses which strengthen the coordination and capacity of the “third pillar” – the NGO sector – to deliver appropriate, higher quality, more effective and quicker humanitarian responses over the current decade 2010–2020’.[1] Formation and first…
In mid-2009, senior staff from Bioforce and RedR met in Paris to discuss how the two organisations might work together in future emergencies. Through that meeting it became clear that both engage in similar activities in emergencies. For example, both undertake learning needs assessments, recruit local trainers, contextualise training materials and procure office and training space. They also provide similar training to the same groups of people (entry- and mid-level staff working in emergencies) and share similar learning objectives and outcomes and complementary methodologies around experiential learning. In short, the meeting concluded that bringing together Bioforce’s and RedR’s training resources,…
La primera edición de este Informe de Buena Práctica sobre La Gestión de la Seguridad de las Operaciones en Entornos Violentos (‘Good Practice Review on Operational Security Management in Violent Environments’), conocido también como GPR 8, fue publicado en 2000 en inglés y francés. Desde entonces el documento ha cobrado gran influencia en la gestión de la seguridad de las operaciones humanitarias, y tiene el mérito de haber incrementado un mayor entendimiento de la buena práctica en este campo en toda la comunidad de organizaciones involucradas en operaciones humanitarias. Aunque gran parte del Informe original, GPR 8, continúa siendo válido,…
La première édition de cette Revue des bonnes pratiques sur la Gestion opérationnelle de la sécurité dans des contextes violents (également appelée RBP 8) a été publiée en 2000. Elle est, depuis, un document novateur en matière de gestion de la sécurité opérationnelle humanitaire et on lui attribue d’avoir facilité la compréhension des bonnes pratiques dans ce domaine pour l’ensemble de la communauté des organisations opérationnelles. Elle a présenté des concepts fondamentaux de gestion de la sécurité et a mis en relief les bonnes politiques et pratiques des diverses approches de la sécurité opérationnelle dans les contextes humanitaires. Bien qu’une…
Humanitarian actors claim adherence to humanitarian principles in order to win the acceptance of local populations, parties to conflict and other stakeholders, and thereby secure access to vulnerable people at risk. In recent years, however, questions have arisen as to whether humanitarian principles are still relevant as a tool for securing access. Using Afghanistan and Pakistan as examples, this article outlines the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)’s approach to strengthening the implementation of acceptance strategies, including by reinforcing adherence to humanitarian principles. Implementing the approach will take time and effort, but with the changing nature of access challenges NRC believes that…
7 December 2010 15:00-17:00 (GMT+00) - Public event, Overseas Development Institute and screened live online Since the publication of the first edition of Good Practice Review 8 on Operational Security Management in Violent Environments a decade ago, the global security environment has changed significantly. New conflict contexts have created new sources of threat to international humanitarian action. Increasing violence against aid workers and their operations, including more kidnappings and lethal attacks, has had serious implications for humanitarian relief work in insecure contexts. Meanwhile, agencies themselves have become much more conscious of the need to provide for the safety and security…
Today the context of aid work has changed substantially, as has the way agencies manage their security and seek to keep their staff and assets safe. New conflicts have created new sources of threat. Increasing violence against aid workers and their operations, including more kidnappings and lethal attacks, has had serious implications for relief work. Equally, though, aid agencies have made significant progress in their understanding of the risks they face and the types of personnel and resources they need to mitigate them. To capture these changes, the Humanitarian Practice Network has produced a revised edition of Good Practice Review 8,…

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