Displaying items by tag: NGOs

Refugee Studies Centre Working Paper 98, by Katherine Rehberg In this paper, the author charts the proliferation of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) programmes in humanitarian settings, and examines the fierce criticisms they have attracted. She uses Vanessa Pupavac's critique of psychosocial programming as constituting 'therapeutic governance', or the or the homogenisation, pathologisation, controlling and depoliticisation of affected communities, to analyse the evolution of these programmes and the debates surrounding them. She then uses this framework to assess current practice in the MHPSS field, as represented by the 2007 Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial…
On 25th April 2014, we will hold a World Café Event at Loughborough University, in room C1.11, beginning at 10.00 am. We want to create a space in which real conversations can be held, in contrast with how we feel regular conferences sometimes stymie exchange by limiting platforms, audiences and knowledge flows. This is why we’re engaging with a combination of The World Café and Open Space methods. In this safe space, we hope to bring together academics with aid and development workers, policy researchers and practitioners, to share experiences and concerns. We think there’s going to be a lot…
Twenty years ago in the first week of April, an ODI colleague and I were in Brussels to launch a new network for relief workers (what later became the Humanitarian Practice Network). It was there we learnt that ten Belgian paratroopers forming part of the United Nations (UN) peacekeeping force in Rwanda had been killed trying to protect the Rwandan Prime Minister. The Prime Minister had also been killed. This came just one day after the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi had both been killed when their aircraft crashed on its approach to Kigali. It later emerged that the plane…
The Centre for Peace and Reconciliation Studies at Coventry University (UK) and Kadir Has University (Turkey) are once again offering our joint summer school in Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding Skills.  This experiential skills-building course is premised on conflict being an inevitable consequence of change and development. While we all come across conflict in our daily lives, the mishandling of it can cause us and those around us significant harm. We offer insights into the dynamics of conflict at all levels, from personal to global. As well as providing an introduction to conflict analysis, we seek to strengthen participants’ competencies in the range of skills needed…
As part of the primary research for the State of the World’s Girls 2013 report,[1] Plan conducted an online survey of humanitarian practitioners and decision-makers. The purpose of the survey was to provide an indication of what is actually happening in humanitarian response settings, with specific reference to adolescent girls. Respondents were asked to express their opinions of present practice and how it might be improved. The survey findings provide an illuminating insight into how response interventions are failing adolescent girls affected by disasters. They also provide an opportunity for practitioners to share practical suggestions for how different sectors can…
Poor access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), whilst not the root cause of violence, can exacerbate the vulnerability of women and girls to violence. Men and boys, people of other gender or sexual identities or other marginalised groups can also sometimes be at risk. As WASH practitioners working in humanitarian and development contexts, we are often aware of the anecdotal but regular examples of incidents of violence in relation to WASH. However, we often do not appreciate the scale of the problem, why it happens or what, if anything, we can or should do about it. In order to…
Sexual violence is an appalling violation of moral codes and international law which occurs in practically all situations of armed conflict and sustained violence. It is an abuse that has severe physical and psychological consequences for the individual, first and foremost, as well as the capacity to tear societies and communities apart. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) works to protect and assist victims of armed conflict and other situations of violence across the world, including victims of sexual abuse. In recent years, the ICRC has extended and improved what it is able to do for victims of…
A woman arrives at a health centre somewhere in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She was raped a few days ago. She does not feel well, she has pelvic pain and she fears she might be pregnant. While admitting her, the consultant asks her a series of questions: Where are you from? What religion are you? What ethnic group do you belong to? What do you do for a living? Do you have any children? Are you married? What happened? When? How? Who did it? What ethnic group did they belong to? How many of them were there? Can…
Gender-based violence (GBV) is a pervasive risk that cuts across continents and contexts. Programming to respond to GBV saves lives and mitigates the debilitating consequences of violence. Yet such programming – and funding to support it – remains a secondary priority in humanitarian crises and development contexts. The dearth of responses is often attributed to a lack of evidence that GBV is occurring. Despite decades of research that points to the pervasiveness of GBV, prevalence or incidence data has become a near-requirement to demonstrate that GBV is on a scale that merits funding and action. However, on its own prevalence…
Emergencies occur against a backdrop of pre-existing gender inequality. From Darfur to New Orleans, such inequality is exacerbated as any existing systems and structures to protect women and girls are changed, weakened or destroyed, when fighting breaks out or a hurricane hits. This creates specific risks that the humanitarian community cannot ignore – risks that disproportionately affect women and girls. Gender-based violence (GBV) programming in emergencies aims to meet the immediate, lifesaving needs of women and girls while laying the groundwork for survivors of such violence, their families and their communities to recover. Failing to include GBV-specific programming in emergency…
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