Displaying items by tag: NGOs

2015 Theme: Opportunity, Mobility and Sustainability: The Humanitarian Aid and Development Perspectives Held under the patronage of H.H. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President, Prime Minister of United Arab Emirates, Ruler of Dubai, supported by Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Est., the United Nations, the UAE Red Crescent Authority, International Humanitarian City, Dubai Cares and the Organisation of Islamic Conference. INDEX will host the 12th Dubai International Humanitarian Aid & Development Conference & Exhibition – DIHAD – 2015. This unique event will take place from the 24 – 26 March 2015 at the Dubai International Convention &…
Since its creation in 1993, the UK meidical NGO Merlin has provided health care in disaster and conflict-affected areas and made a significant contribution to the management of diseases such as TB, Lassa Fever and Malaria. In July 2013 Merlin decided to join forces with Save the Children and the transition process is now very nearly complete. To ensure that Merlin's story is recorded and its achievements and contributions to the humanitarian and health sectors are properly recognised and understood, Merlin has commissioned 'A History of Merlin' that will be published in 2015. The intention is to tell the story…
ALNAP are hosting their next webinar at 10am, on Tuesday 25 November titled 'From the Municipality Up: Engaging Local Governments in Urban Humanitarian Response' (http://www.alnap.org/event/750).  We'd like to get you on board! Complex as they are in their makrets and communities, cties are also intricate in their levels/structures of governance. As centres of politics and commerce, as well as home for tens of thousands, national, regional and local/municpial government structures all have a role. Recently, humanitarians have taken steps to engage National Disaster Management Authorities (NDMAs) (see http://www.alnap.org/ndma). But what about local government? This webinar will present the experiences of…
Allegations that International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) are not accountable to the populations they assist have followed several humanitarian operations, and the 2010 Haiti Earthquake was no exception. In response, initiatives such as the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership guided agencies’ efforts to become more accountable. Results of mechanisms implemented by two INGOs showed that although conditions were created for people to raise concerns, the ability of Haitians to obtain a response from the agencies was limited. The research found that while in principle agencies have the best interests of affected populations as their aim, fragmentation and power asymmetries within the humanitarian sector…
The editors and contributors of this volume are to be congratulated on a practical text that pushes forwards our knowledge and understanding of the virtual space that now surrounds humanitarian operations, and which can have such a physical impact upon them. I encourage you to read it. The articles that follow have certainly brought me up to speed. Hugo Slim – Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC), University of Oxford. [Extract from the foreword ofCommunications Technology and Humanitarian Delivery: Challenges and Opportunities for Security Risk Management.] The articles contained in this publication are dispatches…
Date: 8–10 December 2014 Venue: Thistle Barbican Hotel, London ELRHA is inviting proposals for our facilitated workshop from those wishing to set up a new research partnership between academics and humanitarian practitioners. Successful proposals will receive bespoke support packages valued at £5100. The package will nurture partnerships through early programme development and teams will be invited to attend a three-day residential workshop that will culminate in the drawing up of a working agreement for an identified project with aims, objectives and outcomes as well as outline activities. Core Workshop Outcomes: Partner roles and responsibilities identified Contributions of each partner member identified Identifying…
Launch of the book ‘Aid in Danger’ - Tuesday 19 August, ODI   Aid in danger: Violence against aid workers and the future of humanitarianism   19 August 2014, 14:00-15:30 - Overseas Development Institute (ODI), 203 Blackfriars Rd, SE1 8NJ London To register for this event and attend either in person or online, please follow this link: http://www.odi.org/events/3992-aid-danger-violence-against-aid-workers-future-humanitarianism   EISF and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) are pleased to invite you to the launch of 'Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism' by Larissa Fast—a hard look at violent attacks against aid workers on the frontlines of humanitarian crises. Based on…
EISF new briefing paper Security Risk Management and Religion: Faith and secularism in humanitarian assistance examines the impact that religion has on security risk management for humanitarian agencies,and considers whether a better understanding of religion can improve the security of organisations and individuals in the field. This paper gives an overview of the role of religion in humanitarian assistance, and its historical antecedents, and also studies how religion (and secularism) can impact and influence the identity of an organisation and the values, beliefs and practices of staff and partner agencies. The study examines differing opinions, approaches and vulnerabilities between secular…
The survey will contribute to the State of the Humanitarian System review, which is commissioned by ALNAP. Conducted every three years, the review is a unique opportunity to take stock of the performance of the humanitarian system as a whole. It seeks to measure how well humanitarian actors are performing in their core tasks of saving lives and alleviating human suffering. To take the survey, click on the link that is relevant for you: International and national aid practitioners’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي Host government representatives’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي    
Leadership is a vital element in humanitarian operations. Good leadership can lead to more effective humanitarian response while poor leadership can create delays, confusion, and missed opportunities.   Both agencies and their staff in the field are well aware of this. When polled for ALNAP’s 2012 State of the Humanitarian System report they singled out poor leadership as the greatest constraint to the performance of humanitarian operations.   But what does good leadership look like? And how can we promote it? The humanitarian sector has often assumed that good leadership is all about ensuring that we have talented individual ‘leaders’…
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