Displaying items by tag: NGOs

In just a few years from now, the face of international humanitarian action as we know it will be irrevocably transformed. People and communities affected by crisis - informed, connected and empowered through easy access to technology - will choose from increasingly diverse sources of aid, be they public or private, local or international, while the aid industry risks becoming precisely that: a large-scale business. The role of "traditional" humanitarian actors - beyond helping to facilitate this inexorable power shift - will be limited to pockets of "off grid" situations of protracted conflict and extreme violence, where access will be…
The Humanitarian Innovation Project is delighted to announce the 2015 Humanitarian Innovation Conference, in partnership with the World Humanitarian Summit. Hosted in Oxford on 17 and 18 July 2015, the theme of this year’s conference is ‘facilitating innovation’. As interest and dialogue around humanitarian innovation continues to expand, conference participants are invited to explore the challenges of creating an enabling environment for humanitarian innovation.
Dear HPN members,           The Urban Floods Community of Practice (UFCOP) is holding an online dialogue on Integrated Urban Flood Risk Management from February 9 -20, 2015. During this online forum experts, practitioners and policy makers will explore cross-cutting solutions and innovative approaches in dealing with urban flood risk and discuss lessons learned from a wide range of projects and experiences across regions. Topics to be covered will include flood risk modelling, hazard monitoring, adaptive engineered measures, community-based disaster preparedness and “green” mitigation solutions. You are cordially invited to participate in this Urban Flood Development Dialogue and share your experiences and…
Affordable housing experts have long argued that housing is ‘both the stock of dwelling units (a noun) and the process by which that stock is created and maintained (a verb)’.[1] They have also advocated for ‘supporting’ rather than ‘providing’ approaches: enabling families to upgrade their own housing situation through improved access to and management of land, finance, services, materials, skills and labour rather than the provision of completed houses.[2] Over 30 years after Ian Davis described shelter after disaster as ‘a process, not as an object’,[3] process- oriented approaches to post-disaster housing are still rarely implemented on the ground.[4] From…
Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines on 8 November 2013, killing 6,300 people and injuring another 29,000. An estimated four million people were displaced from their homes. This article reflects on Catholic Relief Service (CRS)’s urban shelter and settlement recovery programme in Tacloban City. The programme, which offers a ‘menu of options’ to households, works closely with affected communities to find shelter solutions by putting decision- making power in the hands of households themselves. The USAID/OFDA and CRS urban shelter and settlements recovery programme The Humanitarian Communities’ Strategic Response Plan for Typhoon Haiyan, approved by the national government, states that families…
As Typhoon Haiyan made landfall on 8 November 2013, aid agencies and donors alike realised that, if ever there were an environment where cash transfers would be appropriate, it was the Philippines. Some 16 million people were affected; 1.1m houses were damaged or destroyed, 4.1m people were displaced and around 6,200 lost their lives. In response, at least 45 international humanitarian agencies implemented cash transfer programmes in one of the most sophisticated humanitarian cash interventions to date. This article reflects on the author’s experience of delivering cash in the Philippines and draws out some key observations, challenges and opportunities for…
In an attempt to better understand the new aid landscape, Me´decins Sans Frontie`res (MSF) conducted three studies to see how MSF field teams interact with ‘new’ aid actors, and how decisions on these relations were made. Three countries where MSF was involved in emergency response in 2013 were selected: Mali, Syria and the Philippines. Actors encountered during these studies included international NGOs from the Middle East and Asia, non-European Red Cross and Red Crescent societies working internationally, diaspora groups, regional organisations, governmental agencies, local NGOs and private sector organisations. Mali Following the resumption of a rebellion in 2012 and a…
Just over a year after Typhoon Haiyan devastated parts of the Philippines important lessons need to be learnt about how international actors partner and work with national organisations. The Philippines has consid- erably more local and national capacity to manage disaster response than many countries in the region. It also has a great deal of experience in dealing with disasters. Despite this, the scale and nature of the typhoon, and the storm surge it triggered, was initially overwhelming. In the weeks that followed, however, local and national humanitarian actors were also undermined by the international response. Despite being some of…
Shortly after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in November 2013, I was employed as an advisor by a long-standing national NGO based in Cebu city, which in turn worked with a number of community-based organisations in Cebu Island, Bohol Island and the wider Tacloban region. The NGO, which went on to receive close to $1 million in funding for relief activities, wanted professional guidance to ensure that it was applying good principles in its work in the food, non-food, shelter and health sectors. This article is based on observations of the experiences of these local organisations as they attempted to…
Sudden-onset emergencies are typically chaotic, making effective communication between communities, humanitarian responders and governments, whether local or international, challenging. Building on experience from the response to Typhoon Bopha in Mindanao in 2012, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) supported the coordination of communication with disaster-affected communities following Typhoon Haiyan with the deployment of an interagency Communications with Communities (CwC) Coordinator and other CwC field staff. CwC cross-sectoral working groups were set up in the typhoon-affected area, convening local and international NGOs, UN agencies, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement, media development actors, local media, mobile operators…
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