Displaying items by tag: NGOs

Leadership is a vital element in humanitarian operations. Good leadership can lead to more effective humanitarian response while poor leadership can create delays, confusion, and missed opportunities.   Both agencies and their staff in the field are well aware of this. When polled for ALNAP’s 2012 State of the Humanitarian System report they singled out poor leadership as the greatest constraint to the performance of humanitarian operations.   But what does good leadership look like? And how can we promote it? The humanitarian sector has often assumed that good leadership is all about ensuring that we have talented individual ‘leaders’…
When the Emergency Capacity Building (ECB) Project was being designed just over a decade ago, humanitarian agencies faced several significant challenges. Disasters were increasing in frequency, severity and complexity, stretching the response capacities of the global humanitarian system. At the same time, standards for humanitarian response were becoming increasingly rigorous, resulting in increased pressure on agencies to demonstrate accountability and the impact of the assistance they were providing. One of the findings of the 2005 Humanitarian Response Review, commissioned by the UN Emergency Response Coordinator, Jan Egeland, was that, while links and collaboration between humanitarian actors were limited, it was…
Launch of EISF Report - Tuesday 8 July, King's College London Humanitarian action in Fragile Contexts: New actors in the Humanitarian Space Tuesday July 8, 2014 – 17h30 BST at King’s College London, Nash Lecture Theatre, Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS To register for this event, please contact Raquel Vazquez eisf-research@eisf.eu   EISF and the Humanitarian Futures Programme are pleased to invite you to a discussion on the key findings of our recent report The Future of Humanitarian Security in Fragile Contexts: An analysis of transformational factors affecting humanitarian action. The transformation of the humanitarian landscape has already made a significant impact on the security risk management…
In the words of UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Antonio Guterres, we face ‘the most serious refugee crisis for 20 years’. Recent displacement from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan, and Somalia has increased the number of refugees in the world to 15.4 million. Significantly, some 10.2 million of these people are in protracted refugee situations. In other words, they have been in limbo for at least 5 years, with an average length of stay in exile of nearly 20 years. Rather than transitioning from emergency relief to long-term reintegration, displaced populations too often get trapped within the system. Published on…
For all the dialogue, debate and reams of policy and advocacy reports on civil–military policy trends, there is surprisingly little research on these issues. All sides of the debate are missing data that might help them make a more convincing case that current civil–military policy trends are either necessary or dangerous, as articulated by governments/militaries and NGOs respectively. Governments are tying aid more explicitly to political and security goals and pushing for a comprehensive approach that integrates civilian and military personnel. Military personnel are receiving growing mandates and resources to work alongside NGOs and local populations to provide ‘civic assistance’…
Most humanitarian donors recognise the core humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality as a foundation for action in situations of conflict and complex emergency. They are enshrined in the ‘European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid’ adopted by European Union (EU) donors in December 2007 and are a key component of the Good Humanitarian Donorship (GHD) principles, first signed by donors in 2003. In practice, however, donors are confronted with numerous challenges to the application of humanitarian principles. There is growing political pressure to portray humanitarian action as part of the crisis management toolbox, or to link it to counter-insurgency,…
  This 8-week interactive course is jointly organised by the Global Health Programme (GHP) at the Graduate Institute Geneva and DiploFoundation. Course curriculum was developed by the GHP, led by Professor Ilona Kickbusch. By the end of this course, participants should be able to: Present the field of global health diplomacy, its history, recent development and key challenges. Identify and define key concepts in global health, global health diplomacy and global health governance. Discuss key cross-cutting issues of global health in relation to foreign policy, trade, climate change, human rights and other related disciplines. Analyse case studies and negotiation processes…
We are now accepting applications for the September 2014 session of the Humanitarian Diplomacy online course, offered by DiploFoundation and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. You can read the full course description at www.diplomacy.edu/courses/humanitarian. Course details Humanitarian diplomacy is persuading decision makers and opinion leaders to act, at all times, in the interests of vulnerable people, and with full respect for fundamental humanitarian principles. The rapid expansion of the number of humanitarian actors in recent years, working for or with governments at all levels and often in complex situations, makes humanitarian diplomacy increasingly important. Humanitarian diplomacy…
 There are more than 45 million displaced people in the world, 80% of them women and children.[1] Disasters, natural and manmade, typically destroy medical facilities, displace medical personnel and erode support structures. In these circumstances an unplanned pregnancy can be fatal, and between a quarter and a half of maternal deaths in crisis situations are due to complications from unsafe abortions.[2] Family planning and post-abortion care are proven, essential and cost-effective interventions that save women's lives.[3] Nonetheless, they have been long neglected in emergencies in favour of conventional priorities such as water, sanitation, shelter, basic healthcare and food. This article…
Inter-Cluster Coordination (ICC) requires clusters to work together to identify and reduce gaps and duplication, establish joint priorities and address cross-cutting issues in order to improve humanitarian response.[1] Information sharing is a first step, but ICC groups can also establish joint assessments and indicators, align training opportunities, set priorities, make recommendations to Humanitarian Country Teams (HCTs) and develop proposals for the Central Emergency Response Fund and other funding pools and engage in other activities. In a recent evaluation of global cluster performance, ICC was judged to be 'ineffective in most cases and there is little integration of cross-cutting issues'.[2] Coordination…
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