Displaying items by tag: NGOs

Date: 8–10 December 2014 Venue: Thistle Barbican Hotel, London ELRHA is inviting proposals for our facilitated workshop from those wishing to set up a new research partnership between academics and humanitarian practitioners. Successful proposals will receive bespoke support packages valued at £5100. The package will nurture partnerships through early programme development and teams will be invited to attend a three-day residential workshop that will culminate in the drawing up of a working agreement for an identified project with aims, objectives and outcomes as well as outline activities. Core Workshop Outcomes: Partner roles and responsibilities identified Contributions of each partner member identified Identifying…
Launch of the book ‘Aid in Danger’ - Tuesday 19 August, ODI   Aid in danger: Violence against aid workers and the future of humanitarianism   19 August 2014, 14:00-15:30 - Overseas Development Institute (ODI), 203 Blackfriars Rd, SE1 8NJ London To register for this event and attend either in person or online, please follow this link: http://www.odi.org/events/3992-aid-danger-violence-against-aid-workers-future-humanitarianism   EISF and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) are pleased to invite you to the launch of 'Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism' by Larissa Fast—a hard look at violent attacks against aid workers on the frontlines of humanitarian crises. Based on…
EISF new briefing paper Security Risk Management and Religion: Faith and secularism in humanitarian assistance examines the impact that religion has on security risk management for humanitarian agencies,and considers whether a better understanding of religion can improve the security of organisations and individuals in the field. This paper gives an overview of the role of religion in humanitarian assistance, and its historical antecedents, and also studies how religion (and secularism) can impact and influence the identity of an organisation and the values, beliefs and practices of staff and partner agencies. The study examines differing opinions, approaches and vulnerabilities between secular…
The survey will contribute to the State of the Humanitarian System review, which is commissioned by ALNAP. Conducted every three years, the review is a unique opportunity to take stock of the performance of the humanitarian system as a whole. It seeks to measure how well humanitarian actors are performing in their core tasks of saving lives and alleviating human suffering. To take the survey, click on the link that is relevant for you: International and national aid practitioners’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي Host government representatives’ survey English | Français | Español | عربي    
Leadership is a vital element in humanitarian operations. Good leadership can lead to more effective humanitarian response while poor leadership can create delays, confusion, and missed opportunities.   Both agencies and their staff in the field are well aware of this. When polled for ALNAP’s 2012 State of the Humanitarian System report they singled out poor leadership as the greatest constraint to the performance of humanitarian operations.   But what does good leadership look like? And how can we promote it? The humanitarian sector has often assumed that good leadership is all about ensuring that we have talented individual ‘leaders’…
When the Emergency Capacity Building (ECB) Project was being designed just over a decade ago, humanitarian agencies faced several significant challenges. Disasters were increasing in frequency, severity and complexity, stretching the response capacities of the global humanitarian system. At the same time, standards for humanitarian response were becoming increasingly rigorous, resulting in increased pressure on agencies to demonstrate accountability and the impact of the assistance they were providing. One of the findings of the 2005 Humanitarian Response Review, commissioned by the UN Emergency Response Coordinator, Jan Egeland, was that, while links and collaboration between humanitarian actors were limited, it was…
Launch of EISF Report - Tuesday 8 July, King's College London Humanitarian action in Fragile Contexts: New actors in the Humanitarian Space Tuesday July 8, 2014 – 17h30 BST at King’s College London, Nash Lecture Theatre, Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS To register for this event, please contact Raquel Vazquez eisf-research@eisf.eu   EISF and the Humanitarian Futures Programme are pleased to invite you to a discussion on the key findings of our recent report The Future of Humanitarian Security in Fragile Contexts: An analysis of transformational factors affecting humanitarian action. The transformation of the humanitarian landscape has already made a significant impact on the security risk management…
In the words of UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Antonio Guterres, we face ‘the most serious refugee crisis for 20 years’. Recent displacement from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan, and Somalia has increased the number of refugees in the world to 15.4 million. Significantly, some 10.2 million of these people are in protracted refugee situations. In other words, they have been in limbo for at least 5 years, with an average length of stay in exile of nearly 20 years. Rather than transitioning from emergency relief to long-term reintegration, displaced populations too often get trapped within the system. Published on…
For all the dialogue, debate and reams of policy and advocacy reports on civil–military policy trends, there is surprisingly little research on these issues. All sides of the debate are missing data that might help them make a more convincing case that current civil–military policy trends are either necessary or dangerous, as articulated by governments/militaries and NGOs respectively. Governments are tying aid more explicitly to political and security goals and pushing for a comprehensive approach that integrates civilian and military personnel. Military personnel are receiving growing mandates and resources to work alongside NGOs and local populations to provide ‘civic assistance’…
Most humanitarian donors recognise the core humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality as a foundation for action in situations of conflict and complex emergency. They are enshrined in the ‘European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid’ adopted by European Union (EU) donors in December 2007 and are a key component of the Good Humanitarian Donorship (GHD) principles, first signed by donors in 2003. In practice, however, donors are confronted with numerous challenges to the application of humanitarian principles. There is growing political pressure to portray humanitarian action as part of the crisis management toolbox, or to link it to counter-insurgency,…
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