Displaying items by tag: Health

Over the last few years there has been a growing recognition that working in partnership can improve humanitarian outcomes. A range of partnership models have been deployed, including North–South cooperation, and partnerships among international NGOs, between them and national and local NGOs and with host and local governments, as well as directly with local communities. This article outlines MERCY Malaysia’s experience of working in partnership in Malaysia, Myanmar and Gaza. Malaysia While Malaysia has not been hit by a major natural disaster, annual seasonal floods affect different parts of the country at slightly different times of the year. MERCY Malaysia…
Le 10 janvier 2010, l’équipe humanitaire globale passa la journée à examiner nos approches actuelles à la réponse humanitaire en zone urbaine.  Nous conclûmes que hhle défi le plus significatif auquel nous aurions à faire face serait un tremblement de terre majeur dans une zone urbaine densément peuplée.  Nous pensâmes que nous avions besoin d’élargir notre capacité et notre compréhension de quel type d’assistance on pourrait avoir besoin en préparation d’un tel événement.  Moins de 48 heures plus tard le tremblement de terre frappait Port-au-Prince, laissant finalement 220.000 morts et 1,5 millions de gens sans foyer.  En quelques heures, l’équipe…
On 10 January 2010 Oxfam GB’s global humanitarian team spent the day reviewing our current approaches to humanitarian response in urban areas. We concluded that the most significant challenge we could possibly face would be a major earthquake in a densely populated urban area. We felt we needed to boost our capacity and understanding of what sort of assistance might be needed in preparation for such an event. Less than 48 hours later the earthquake struck Port-au-Prince, eventually leaving up to 220,000 dead and 1.5 million homeless. Within hours Oxfam’s team in Haiti was responding despite massive personal loss, and…
In the wake of the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) mobilised the biggest single-country emergency response operation it had ever mounted. Deployments included field hospitals, one of which was a specially designed rapid response mobile and light hospital with 30 expatriate staff. This was initially set up in Port-au-Prince at the main university hospital, and later relocated to Petit Goave in the south-west of Haiti. This article describes the lessons learned during the hospital deployment.   The RDEH ERU The Rapid Deployment Emergency Hospital is a health Emergency Response…
As a humanitarian crisis, the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 is comparable to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. In Aceh in Indonesia, the most affected area, 230,000 people died and half a million were made homeless. By comparison in Haiti, roughly 200,000 people died and a million were made homeless. Indonesia had competent central government, but reconstruction in affected areas in Aceh was made more difficult by ongoing insurgencies there. While Haiti had no insurgency at the time of the earthquake, it suffered from weak governance, a near-total lack of governmental services and the inheritance of repeated insurgencies and dictatorships.…
Nunca antes ha estado tan claro cuáles son las intervenciones que deben llevarse a cabo para mitigar las consecuencias perjudiciales para la salud que provocan las guerras y los desastres naturales, y qué estándares deben esforzarse por alcanzar estas intervenciones; de manera similar, nunca ha sido mayor la gama de intervenciones a nuestra disposición. A pesar de estos avances, estudios recientes del sistema mundial de ayuda humanitaria indican que se está produciendo un fallo en su entrega. También ponen de relieve la extrema carencia de datos fiables que nos ayuden a entender cuánto sufren las poblaciones en crisis y en…
The paper examines the origin of evidence-based decision-making in medical care, its extension into public health and ultimately its diffusion throughout humanitarian assistance. The paper highlights key concepts in evidence-based practices, examines recommendations from recent published humanitarian reviews, and presents options to strengthen evidence-based decision-making in the design, implementation and evaluation of humanitarian assistance. It concludes that, while new evidence can inform humanitarian action and improve humanitarian outcomes, evidence-based decision-making often requires no additional scientific data per se, but rather an understanding of well-established technical best practices in conjunction with financial resources and political will. Humanitarian assistance has many influences…
Over one million people live in Karamoja, a region found in the north Eastern part of Uganda. To a visitor passing through from the capital city Kampala, Karamoja may look like any other region in Uganda but appearances can be deceptive. The region is characterised by the worst humanitarian and development indicators in Uganda. The problem of underdevelopment in Karamoja is often characterised as a ‘cultural’ problem, however, this needs to be understood within the delicate livelihood systems that operate within the region. The people of Karamoja have traditionally based their livelihood on agro-pastoralism. Like many other pastoral societies in…
Political instability and violence have massive impacts on the health of affected populations. Studies show that more people die of treatable diseases during conflict than die from conflict-related injuries. This is because the already poor state of healthcare facilities is often further degraded, to the point where diseases that require only basic interventions – such as malaria or diarrhoea – cannot be cured. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) – or Sleeping Sickness, as it is more commonly known – is a particularly problematic disease. It tends to surge during conflict, unlike malaria or diarrhoea it demands difficult diagnostics and treatment and…
Heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and cancer account for approximately half the total of deaths  in the occupied Palestinian territories.  The Israeli blockade, the Hamas takeover in 2007 and the recent Israeli military operation in Gaza throughout December and January 2009, has led to an almost complete bureaucratisation and politicisation of the health care system in Gaza meaning patients requiring specialised health care are forced to seek treatment outside, namely in Egypt, Jordan, Israel or East Jerusalem. Although healthcare resources are adequate ( 1.4 beds per person, 0.9 health care centers per 10, 000 people, and 2.6 physicians per 1,000…

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