Displaying items by tag: Health

Most humanitarian donors recognise the core humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality as a foundation for action in situations of conflict and complex emergency. They are enshrined in the ‘European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid’ adopted by European Union (EU) donors in December 2007 and are a key component of the Good Humanitarian Donorship (GHD) principles, first signed by donors in 2003. In practice, however, donors are confronted with numerous challenges to the application of humanitarian principles. There is growing political pressure to portray humanitarian action as part of the crisis management toolbox, or to link it to counter-insurgency,…
  This 8-week interactive course is jointly organised by the Global Health Programme (GHP) at the Graduate Institute Geneva and DiploFoundation. Course curriculum was developed by the GHP, led by Professor Ilona Kickbusch. By the end of this course, participants should be able to: Present the field of global health diplomacy, its history, recent development and key challenges. Identify and define key concepts in global health, global health diplomacy and global health governance. Discuss key cross-cutting issues of global health in relation to foreign policy, trade, climate change, human rights and other related disciplines. Analyse case studies and negotiation processes…
We are now accepting applications for the September 2014 session of the Humanitarian Diplomacy online course, offered by DiploFoundation and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. You can read the full course description at www.diplomacy.edu/courses/humanitarian. Course details Humanitarian diplomacy is persuading decision makers and opinion leaders to act, at all times, in the interests of vulnerable people, and with full respect for fundamental humanitarian principles. The rapid expansion of the number of humanitarian actors in recent years, working for or with governments at all levels and often in complex situations, makes humanitarian diplomacy increasingly important. Humanitarian diplomacy…
The Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) Programme opens its second call for proposals on 26 May 2014 with up to £3.5 million of research funding available. We are holding a webinar on 4 June, linking to the R2HC team in London, to present details of this opportunity to apply for research funding. The R2HC programme aims to increase the level and quality of collaborative research on recognised public health challenges in humanitarian crises, to inform effective humanitarian interventions and improve health outcomes. This webinar will be an opportunity to catch up on the outcomes and learning from the…
The Governance Innovation in Security and Development (GISD) research team will conduct a program review of the support to the Governance sector on 18-19 June at Columbia University. We will limit to 20-30 participants. Experts in provision of essential services, particularly core service delivery, would be particularly helpful to map the boundaries, and when needed, essential skills that short-term military experts would need to support restoration of services and development of local capacity. The GISD research project seeks solutions to the challenges of supporting governance in fragile environments. The research team investigates issues and trends in the stability sectors—social well-being, promotion…
 There are more than 45 million displaced people in the world, 80% of them women and children.[1] Disasters, natural and manmade, typically destroy medical facilities, displace medical personnel and erode support structures. In these circumstances an unplanned pregnancy can be fatal, and between a quarter and a half of maternal deaths in crisis situations are due to complications from unsafe abortions.[2] Family planning and post-abortion care are proven, essential and cost-effective interventions that save women's lives.[3] Nonetheless, they have been long neglected in emergencies in favour of conventional priorities such as water, sanitation, shelter, basic healthcare and food. This article…
Yemen is a country racked with violence. Religious sectarianism, rebellion in the north, a secessionist movement in the south and the resurgence of Al-Qaeda are all playing out against a background of economic collapse, insufficient state capacity, corruption and tribalism. A large number of security incidents have affected Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) projects in Aden and Amran governorate north of the capital Sana'a (some 40 documented between April 2010 and July 2013 by MSF's French section alone), including security forces and armed men entering medical facilities to seek out patients, family and tribal revenge attacks against patients or doctors within…
Refugee Studies Centre Working Paper 98, by Katherine Rehberg In this paper, the author charts the proliferation of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) programmes in humanitarian settings, and examines the fierce criticisms they have attracted. She uses Vanessa Pupavac's critique of psychosocial programming as constituting 'therapeutic governance', or the or the homogenisation, pathologisation, controlling and depoliticisation of affected communities, to analyse the evolution of these programmes and the debates surrounding them. She then uses this framework to assess current practice in the MHPSS field, as represented by the 2007 Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial…
The current Ebola (filovirus) outbreak in West Africa has focused attention once again on the detection of and response to the disease. By late March some 60 people had died in Guinea – the first recognised outbreak of the virus in the country – with suspected cases reported in neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia. In Sub-Saharan Africa, when a medical professional suspects Ebola disease, the patient's blood sample is typically sent elsewhere in the country or abroad to a biosafety level-4 (BSL-4) laboratory for diagnostic confirmation.[1] If positive, an outbreak is declared and an international response initiated, consisting of case…
Monday 17 February 2014 Venue: Royal Society Of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, LONDON, W1G 0AE In early November Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines with wind speeds of up to 196mph, killing and injuring thousands and destroying homes and infrastructure. The resulting devastation and human suffering caught the attention of the world and many countries, the United Kingdom included, sent volunteers to assist the affected communities. What those volunteers experienced was challenging, emotive and sometimes quite unexpected. This meeting aims to highlight the diverse work of some of the agencies involved and share the lessons learned for disaster response in the…

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