Displaying items by tag: Food security

Primary collection of household food security data is typically both expensive and cumbersome. As a result, decisions on humanitarian assistance are often based on information that is out of date, or on unsatisfactory aggregate proxy indicators. However, thanks to increasingly widespread access to mobile telephony, many survey respondents can now be contacted through their mobile phones, offering the possibility of much cheaper, faster and more timely data collection. In order to assess the suitability of mobile text surveys for household food security assessments, the World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a field test in North Kivu province in the Democratic Republic…
The link between sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and food insecurity is well documented.[1] Tensions within households, including domestic violence, can rise during periods of food scarcity, and tends to decline as assistance fills the food gap. Food assistance can also reduce the incidence of survival sex or sex for food. While food assistance programmes can support initiatives that contribute to preventing and mitigating SGBV, they can also undermine the protection of women and girls if they are implemented without sufficient understanding of the operational context. Beyond usual relief operations, food assistance is also directly used to support SGBV survivors…
In a climate of fear, violence and uncertainty, healthcare workers have found themselves on the frontline once more in the Central African Republic (CAR). The latest bout of violence erupted on December 5th in Bangui, and to a lesser degree in Bossangoa and Bozoum, deepening the humanitarian plight of the people of CAR. Communities that already had very little, following years of unrest and food insecurity, are now living in ever greater fear. The impact of violence in the capital has furthermore been worsened by the closure of most hospitals and clinics in Bangui due to rampant insecurity. If doctors…
In late 2012, Oxfam and WFP collaborated on a joint review, entitled, 'Engaging with Markets in Humanitarian Responses', which aimed to understand how humanitarian agencies are engaged in supporting markets. The review found that, beyond the basic consensus that agencies should 'do no harm' to markets, and use them where they are sufficiently functional, there was a range of perceptions regarding the extent to (which humanitarian organisations should and could support and strengthen markets to improve their functionality. There is no doubt that, for many international organisations, humanitarian interventions today are very different to those in the past. Now, working…
The Center for Sustainable Development is pleased to offer to a blended learning, 2-month diploma program. September 2-October 31, 2013 Including a 5 day live workshop in Antigua, Guatemala: September 30 - October 4, 2013 The training program is offered in 3 sections: Section 1. Designing & Funding International Development Projects Section 2. Designing & Funding Nonprofit Projects in Developed Nations Sección 3. América Latina: Español. Diseño y Financiamiento de Proyectos Sostenibles de Desarrollo Internacional
Join students from all over the world for an intensive series of courses. Get an Online Diploma: Integrated Community Based Adaptation, Disaster Risk Reduction & Rural Development CSDi is announcing the launch of a diploma module of eight online Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Community Based Adaptation (CBA) & Rural Development field courses. These courses begin by introducing basic climate change concepts, and develop as participants identify local community vulnerabilities, identify climate change risks and hazards, investigate appropriate solutions, develop full projects, launch and manage them. A strong course component is the integration of DRR and CBA within course participant’s traditional…
Livelihoods in South Sudan are based on transhumant animal husbandry, agriculture, fishing, trade and gathering wild food, with various combinations of these elements making up specific household economies depending on each zone’s agro-ecological conditions and tribal traditions and culture. Livelihood systems were first mapped out by Operation Lifeline Sudan (OLS) in the mid-1990s. Using the Household Economy Analysis (HEA) framework, seven distinct zones were identified (Figure 1). These zones are still used in livelihoods planning and analysis today. Livelihood systems in these zones have undergone drastic changes during the prolonged civil war (1983–2005) and in the period of post-conflict transition…
Independence was a milestone in the history of South Sudan, raising hopes for long-lasting peace and stability, development and economic growth. Well into the second year of independence, the challenges remain enormous and there are regular setbacks. One key question has been how we can continue to respond to emergencies without losing sight of longer-term development needs. This article elaborates on some of the key socio-economic challenges in South Sudan, with a particular focus on food insecurity. Food aid constitutes the bulk of the international community’s humanitarian response in South Sudan, with 2.7 million people receiving food assistance in 2012.…
This review is concerned with the financing arrangements for programmes that address acute malnutrition at scale through the community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM). The CMAM approach is geared towards the early detection, treatment and counselling of moderately and severely acutely malnourished children, in the community, by community agents. Until the late 1990s, treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) was through therapeutic feeding centres in hospitals and healthcare centres. Performance was poor, coverage was extremely limited (less than 5% of the SAM population), mortality was often in excess of 30% and recovery rates were low. The CMAM approach was first…
CSDi is announcing the launch of a diploma module of eight online Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Community Based Adaptation (CBA) & Rural Development field courses. These courses begin by introducing basic climate change concepts, and develop as participants identify local community vulnerabilities, identify climate change risks and hazards, investigate appropriate solutions, develop full projects, launch and manage them. A strong course component is the integration of DRR and CBA within course participant’s traditional development projects.
Page 1 of 18

Standard Login