Displaying items by tag: Donors/governments

Refugee Studies Centre Working Paper 98, by Katherine Rehberg In this paper, the author charts the proliferation of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) programmes in humanitarian settings, and examines the fierce criticisms they have attracted. She uses Vanessa Pupavac's critique of psychosocial programming as constituting 'therapeutic governance', or the or the homogenisation, pathologisation, controlling and depoliticisation of affected communities, to analyse the evolution of these programmes and the debates surrounding them. She then uses this framework to assess current practice in the MHPSS field, as represented by the 2007 Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial…
On 25th April 2014, we will hold a World Café Event at Loughborough University, in room C1.11, beginning at 10.00 am. We want to create a space in which real conversations can be held, in contrast with how we feel regular conferences sometimes stymie exchange by limiting platforms, audiences and knowledge flows. This is why we’re engaging with a combination of The World Café and Open Space methods. In this safe space, we hope to bring together academics with aid and development workers, policy researchers and practitioners, to share experiences and concerns. We think there’s going to be a lot…
Older people constitute a significant proportion of the global population. Estimates for 2013 show that people over 50 account for 22% of the population, and those over 60 12%. By 2050, over-60s will account for 22%, exceeding the number of children under 15 for the first time in history. Globally, children under five account for 9% of the total population, though there are significant regional differences. In Africa, for example, children under five make up 15% of the population.[1] Consequently, in humanitarian crises it is possible that these two groups will account for up to a third of affected people.…
Professor Yakin Ertürk will present this year's Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture:  'Refugee rights: beyond the 1951 Convention'  The Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture is named in honour of Barbara Harrell-Bond, Founding Director of the Refugee Studies Centre. Yakin Ertürk (Turkey) received a PhD in Development Sociology from Cornell University in 1980. She served as a faculty member at the Department of Sociology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, from September 1986 to October 2010. In addition to her academic career, she has worked for various national and international agencies on rural development and women in development, and she has provided training to public and…
In early 2011, the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) hosted a workshop with members of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Humanitarian Space and Civil Military Relations Task Force on counter-terrorism and humanitarian action. Humanitarian practitioners had expressed concerns with the implications of counter-terrorism measures for humanitarian operations, particularly in contexts such as the Horn of Africa, occupied Palestinian territories (oPt) and Afghanistan. Overall, the workshop exposed deep levels of anxiety concerning perceived risks, a lack of clarity as to what the exact risks were and a culture of secrecy, including a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’…
South Sudan remains chronically dependent on humanitarian assistance. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) period, from 2005 to independence in July 2011, saw various shifts between humanitarian and development funding, but on balance the bulk of assistance continued to be delivered through humanitarian modalities. So too in the first two years following independence, with annual humanitarian appeals hovering around $1 billion, as compared to approximately half that amount targeted for development programmes in the UN’s first Development Assistance Framework for the new republic. This reliance on humanitarian assistance has much to do with continued insecurity and low government capacity. The new…
This review is concerned with the financing arrangements for programmes that address acute malnutrition at scale through the community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM). The CMAM approach is geared towards the early detection, treatment and counselling of moderately and severely acutely malnourished children, in the community, by community agents. Until the late 1990s, treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) was through therapeutic feeding centres in hospitals and healthcare centres. Performance was poor, coverage was extremely limited (less than 5% of the SAM population), mortality was often in excess of 30% and recovery rates were low. The CMAM approach was first…
About the course The training covers essential methodologies of evaluation and applies them to conflict intervention, peace-building, and recovery initiatives. We cover challenges such as rudimentary plans, lack of information and complex implementation structures. 
This SiND Security Fact Sheet for Humanitarian Agencies describes shifting patterns in security incidents for aid actors from 1996 to 2010. It asks whether a ‘risk transfer’, from UN and Red Cross agencies to INGOs and from International to national staff, really has taken place.  The fact sheet can be viewed here.
In recent decades the drylands of the Horn of Africa have become one of the most disaster-prone regions in the world. Drought in particular affects more people, more frequently than any other disaster. Drought periods were not always so disastrous but, combined with the region’s underlying economic, social and environmental vulnerability, the impacts upon dryland inhabitants are extreme. Despite calls for greater investment in preparedness, early response and long-term resiliencebuilding, the 2011 drought crisis in the region illustrates how this has not yet been translated into reality. It is an intuitive belief that investment in early response and resilience-building in…
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