Displaying items by tag: Coordination

As Typhoon Haiyan made landfall on 8 November 2013, aid agencies and donors alike realised that, if ever there were an environment where cash transfers would be appropriate, it was the Philippines. Some 16 million people were affected; 1.1m houses were damaged or destroyed, 4.1m people were displaced and around 6,200 lost their lives. In response, at least 45 international humanitarian agencies implemented cash transfer programmes in one of the most sophisticated humanitarian cash interventions to date. This article reflects on the author’s experience of delivering cash in the Philippines and draws out some key observations, challenges and opportunities for…
Shortly after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in November 2013, I was employed as an advisor by a long-standing national NGO based in Cebu city, which in turn worked with a number of community-based organisations in Cebu Island, Bohol Island and the wider Tacloban region. The NGO, which went on to receive close to $1 million in funding for relief activities, wanted professional guidance to ensure that it was applying good principles in its work in the food, non-food, shelter and health sectors. This article is based on observations of the experiences of these local organisations as they attempted to…
Sudden-onset emergencies are typically chaotic, making effective communication between communities, humanitarian responders and governments, whether local or international, challenging. Building on experience from the response to Typhoon Bopha in Mindanao in 2012, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) supported the coordination of communication with disaster-affected communities following Typhoon Haiyan with the deployment of an interagency Communications with Communities (CwC) Coordinator and other CwC field staff. CwC cross-sectoral working groups were set up in the typhoon-affected area, convening local and international NGOs, UN agencies, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement, media development actors, local media, mobile operators…
Humanitarian action as we know it is facing the most challenging test of our time. The catastrophic humanitarian situation in Syria – that has spread well beyond national borders – continues unabated while a political solution remains elusive. Beyond the Middle East, the sheer scale of humanitarian needs in a number of concurrent, complex crises – South Sudan, Central African Republic, Afghanistan, Ukraine, to name but a few – is unprecedented. The onus, naturally, is on those who carry arms and those who back them to stop the bloodshed and establish the foundations for lasting peace. The common violation of…
2015 Theme: Opportunity, Mobility and Sustainability: The Humanitarian Aid and Development Perspectives Held under the patronage of H.H. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President, Prime Minister of United Arab Emirates, Ruler of Dubai, supported by Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Est., the United Nations, the UAE Red Crescent Authority, International Humanitarian City, Dubai Cares and the Organisation of Islamic Conference. INDEX will host the 12th Dubai International Humanitarian Aid & Development Conference & Exhibition – DIHAD – 2015. This unique event will take place from the 24 – 26 March 2015 at the Dubai International Convention &…
ALNAP are hosting their next webinar at 10am, on Tuesday 25 November titled 'From the Municipality Up: Engaging Local Governments in Urban Humanitarian Response' (http://www.alnap.org/event/750).  We'd like to get you on board! Complex as they are in their makrets and communities, cties are also intricate in their levels/structures of governance. As centres of politics and commerce, as well as home for tens of thousands, national, regional and local/municpial government structures all have a role. Recently, humanitarians have taken steps to engage National Disaster Management Authorities (NDMAs) (see http://www.alnap.org/ndma). But what about local government? This webinar will present the experiences of…
Summary of Findings Military situation in Kobani has become worse with ISIS advances towards the town. The situation around the border is tense, and conflict has spilt onto the Turkish side on a number of occasions. Almost the entire civilian population of Kobani region has crossed the border into Turkey. Many of the displaced have moved to other cities (Urfa, Gaziantep, Birecik etc.), though a large population remain in the border-town of Suruc. Needs remain considerable in Suruc, and burden upon host community is increasingly difficult to manage. Local authorities (Suruc/Urfa Health Department, and municipalities of Suruc, Urfa, Diyabekir etc.)…
In the run up to the 2015 ALNAP Conference on 'Working Together', ALNAP and the authors of the Missed Opportunities report on strengthening national and partnership-based humanitarian responses are collaborating to launch a Community of Practice on Partnerships and Local Capacity in Emergencies. We are delighted to invite people to join this Community of Practice (CoP) who have a special interest or practical role working on these issues: • You may be working at the field level to deliver humanitarian programmes in a national or local organisation or government agency.• Or you may work for an international NGO working with…
As the boundaries of the humanitarian sector expand to respond to evolving and rapidly changing needs, partnership brokers are becoming an increasingly critical part of the humanitarian enterprise. The 2006 Tsunami Evaluation Coalition concluded that working in partnerships with local players is key to building resilience to disasters and delivering rapid, effective emergency response. A multi-agency publication on partnerships with national non-governmental organisations in humanitarian response argues that partnerships help to strengthen the relevance and appropriateness of humanitarian responses and improve the overall effectiveness of assistance by enhancing accountability to disaster-affected people[1]. The humanitarian system is under considerable pressure to radically…
Effective leadership requires not only the right people in the right place, but also an environment that enables leaders to lead. This is particularly relevant for Humanitarian Coordinators, who lack formal authority over their 'followers', and therefore rely heavily on a conducive environment in order to deliver on their mandate.[1] In the past six years significant progress has been made in improving the performance of Coordinators. It is now time to broaden our focus to the environment where these leaders are placed: the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) and, more broadly, the UN system. Strengthening Humanitarian Coordinators: we've come a long…
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