Displaying items by tag: Conflict & insecurity

This e-learning module explores the legal framework applicable to health care during armed conflicts and other emergencies. Through interactive case studies, learning activities, animations and other media, users will be guided through the main legal principles and become familiar with common dilemmas faced by health-care personnel.   This e-leaning offers a practical, user-friendly and interactive approach to online learning, and will suit a variety of people with or without a legal background. This e-learning is one of the resources developed in the framework of the Health Care in Danger project (www.healthcareindanger.org)
As part of Refugee Week (15-21 June), the Refugee Studies Centre is joining forces with Oxford Refugee Week and Asylum Welcome to hold a panel discussion on the topic: ‘How should Europe respond to the Mediterranean refugee crisis?’   Chair: Dr Jeff Crisp (independent consultant and RSC Advisor)   Speakers: Professor Alexander Betts (Refugee Studies Centre) Professor Cathryn Costello (Refugee Studies Centre) Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré (Edge Hill University and RSC Visiting Research Fellow) Dr Nando Sigona (University of Birmingham and RSC Research Associate)   Contact: Tamsin Kelk: tamsin.kelk@qeh.ox.ac.uk This event is open to the public and is free, but registration…
As part of Oxford Refugee Week, and the wider National Refugee Week, Oxford City Amnesty Group are holding a special edition of their monthly meeting and inviting local and national guests to speak about the humanitarian crisis in Syria, the UK government's response to date and how cities such as Oxford have the power to directly support some of the most vulnerable of Syrian refugees. Professor Dawn Chatty will speak at this event together with Amnesty UK's Country Co-ordinator for Syria, Hannah Slater, to set the situation in context. This event is free to attend and open to all. No…
This working paper traces the institutional dynamics surrounding the European Return Platform for Unaccompanied Minors (ERPUM), the first ever EU pilot attempting to organize the administrative deportation of unaccompanied minors. The first phase of ERPUM was initiated in January 2011, and its second stage began in December 2012 and was then discontinued in June 2014. Its core members were Sweden, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, and its observers were Denmark and Belgium. The pilot illustrates how bureaucratic networks in the European landscape of asylum policy interpreted the need to find “durable solutions” for unaccompanied minors as providing justification…
Aid programming in fragile and conflict-affected environments is often hamstrung by the assumption that state systems always break down in conflict environments. This limits programming in areas where there are humanitarian operations, which are normally designed, managed and delivered by external parties and thus rarely start the process of rebuilding state systems or ‘state-like’ systems. Our work in Syria over the last 18 months proves otherwise. Contrary to received wisdom, it is possible to begin early recovery and development in the midst of conflict. Recovery can be locally led and managed. There is an alternative to externally designed, managed and…
All are warmly invited to attend the RSC's 2015 Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture. More information, including details on how to register, is below. Speaker Professor Miriam Ticktin (The New School for Social Research) Abstract With the grounding assumption that innocence plays a central role in the politics of forced migration and asylum, this lecture will delve into the idea of innocence, trying to understand it and render its workings more legible, and arguing that it is a political – not simply a religious or moral – concept. By examining the figure of the child, the trafficked victim, the migrant, asylum…
Humanitarian agencies are questioning when and how to engage with violent urban settings. Some of them are developing new and innovative approaches to protection and aid delivery. Others are more hesitant. Building on his TED talk, Robert Muggah describes four ways they are thinking about fragile cities. The breakneck pace and scale of urbanization is precipitating an unprecedented demographic transition. Not surprising, violence is also migrating to the metropole. Overlapping forms of violence are emerging in fast growing lower-income neighborhoods and informal settlements of the South. Some war-torn cities – Aleppo, Gaza, and Mosul – are especially badly affected, with…
In just a few years from now, the face of international humanitarian action as we know it will be irrevocably transformed. People and communities affected by crisis - informed, connected and empowered through easy access to technology - will choose from increasingly diverse sources of aid, be they public or private, local or international, while the aid industry risks becoming precisely that: a large-scale business. The role of "traditional" humanitarian actors - beyond helping to facilitate this inexorable power shift - will be limited to pockets of "off grid" situations of protracted conflict and extreme violence, where access will be…
We are pleased to invite you to submit abstracts to the Disaster, Conflict and Social Crisis Research Network (DCSCRN) at the 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association 2015, which will be held in Prague from Tuesday 25th August to Friday 28th August. The purpose of ESA RN08 Disaster, Conflict and Social Crisis Research Network (DCSCRN) is to promote the study, research and analysis of natural, technological and social disasters with a view to contributing to the development of disaster-resilient European communities and preventing or mitigating the human, economic, social, cultural and psychological effects of disasters. A number of questions…
This paper puts forward the argument that substantive attention to the phenomenon of ‘trust’ constitutes a surprising missing chapter in contemporary repatriation policy and theory. In particular, the paper highlights the need for repatriation theorists and policy-makers to foreground trust relations between refugees and their states of origin in dominant frameworks. It argues that emphasis on these refugee-state trust relations presents a logical development, both of contemporary theory on the political content of repatriation and of due consideration of the formidable barrier to repatriation posed by refugees’ distrust of their state of origin. The paper puts forward a trust-based lens,…
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