Displaying items by tag: Conflict & insecurity

Since its creation in 1993, the UK meidical NGO Merlin has provided health care in disaster and conflict-affected areas and made a significant contribution to the management of diseases such as TB, Lassa Fever and Malaria. In July 2013 Merlin decided to join forces with Save the Children and the transition process is now very nearly complete. To ensure that Merlin's story is recorded and its achievements and contributions to the humanitarian and health sectors are properly recognised and understood, Merlin has commissioned 'A History of Merlin' that will be published in 2015. The intention is to tell the story…
Over the past two decades, states and inter-governmental bodies have adopted increasingly robust counter-terrorism laws and policies. At the same time, humanitarian crises in countries like Somalia, Mali, and Syria have reaffirmed the continued importance of principled humanitarian action. Counter-terrorism laws and humanitarian action share several goals, including the prevention of attacks against civilians and of diversion of aid to armed actors. Yet tensions between these two areas of law and policy have emerged in recent years, resulting in challenges for governments and humanitarian actors. These include obstacles to open and frank discussions about the practical and legal consequences of counterterrorism laws for humanitarian action, especially in territories where listed armed…
Summary of Findings Military situation in Kobani has become worse with ISIS advances towards the town. The situation around the border is tense, and conflict has spilt onto the Turkish side on a number of occasions. Almost the entire civilian population of Kobani region has crossed the border into Turkey. Many of the displaced have moved to other cities (Urfa, Gaziantep, Birecik etc.), though a large population remain in the border-town of Suruc. Needs remain considerable in Suruc, and burden upon host community is increasingly difficult to manage. Local authorities (Suruc/Urfa Health Department, and municipalities of Suruc, Urfa, Diyabekir etc.)…
Speaker: Her Royal Highness Princess Basma bint Talal The communities comprising the modern Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan have a long history as refugee hosts. HRH Princess Basma bint Talal will examine the ways in which earlier refugee communities’ experience of displacement itself contributed to their integration within the developing Jordanian state. Princess Basma will discuss the ways in which Jordan’s Circassian, Chechen, and Armenian communities have negotiated different aspects of their specific identities and integrated in Jordan, considering the role of forced migration itself in creating identities.
Humanitarian crises frequently give rise to new kinds of settlements for internally displaced persons (IDPs). In the Balkans in the 1990s, humanitarian actors provided assistance in ‘collective centres’ – pre-existing buildings such as schools and churches – which subsequently received increased attention. I wrote an article in this magazine about the ‘tent villages’ set up following the earthquake in Pakistan in October 2005. The conflict in South Sudan since 15 December 2013 has arguably produced yet another type of IDP settlement to add to the humanitarian lexicon: ‘Protection of Civilians (PoC) sites’. These settlements have hosted more than 100,000 IDPs…
Understanding humanitarian needs is key to responding to humanitarian crises efficiently. Yet in many humanitarian crises, obtaining an accurate picture of humanitarian needs has been a challenge. This has been particularly true in the Central African Republic (CAR), where humanitarian access and resources have been limited. In June 2014, the Assessment Capacities Project (ACAPS) published an analytical report on humanitarian needs assessments in CAR[1]. The report aimed to strengthen the humanitarian community’s understanding of and response to the CAR crisis by: • Analysing the current situation in terms of humanitarian needs assessments. • Identifying gaps, limitations and lessons. • Making…
When they were done with me they went back to my daughters. A 14-year-old girl. A 12-year-old girl. Both they raped. We just ran with underwear, they ran another way. I haven’t seen them since then. I live in pain right now.[1] Since December 2013, vicious attacks in Bangui have caused over half the city’s population to flee their homes. As soon as the crisis hit, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) deployed two case workers from its programmes in Kagabandoro to Bangui to provide gender-based violence (GBV) emergency case management services to survivors, and later opening listening centres in Bangui.…
Heavy fighting in the Central African Republic since the overthrow of the government of President Francois Bozize in March 2013 has forced thousands of people to flee into the bush, leaving them at the mercy of disease, without adequate healthcare and with scant access to food and clean water. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) had been focusing on livelihood support in the north of the country, but it shifted into emergency response mode, often in partnership with the Central African Red Cross Society. Teams evacuated casualties, collected and buried dead bodies, provided emergency medical treatment, traced people…
Once a country where Muslims and non-Muslims married and lived together, the Central African Republic (CAR) is now divided along ethnic and religious lines that have pitted communities against one another. Atrocities committed by now ex-Seleka fighters, a coalition of mostly Muslim rebel groups, against Christian communities elicited reprisals against Muslims by Christian militias known as anti- Balaka. This tit-for-tat conflict has produced a large-scale humanitarian crisis in a forgotten country where UN officials have repeatedly warned of a risk of genocide, and where both sides may have committed war crimes. Since the Seleka overran Bangui in March 2013, the…
The conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR) has been raging for over a year with violence, often linked to religious affiliation, involving rape, murder, torture, pillaging and the destruction of property. The scale of the emergency is immense: according to OCHA, as of 11 August 2014 an estimated 2.5 million people out of a total population of 4.6m are in need of humanitarian assistance, and a fifth of the population (almost a million people) have been displaced. Humanitarian workers are having difficulty meeting these needs. Interventions are severely underfunded, and agencies are struggling to register beneficiaries and distribute commodities,…
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