Displaying items by tag: Conflict & insecurity

The Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs (HESPER) Scale is a new needs assessment tool that provides a quick, scientifically robust way of assessing the perceived serious needs of people affected by large-scale humanitarian emergencies.[1] Perceived needs are needs which are felt or expressed by people themselves, and are problem areas with which they would like help. The HESPER Scale is applicable to a wide range of humanitarian settings in low- and middle-income countries, including acute or chronic situations, and urban or rural settings. The scale focuses on needs as perceived by adults, which may include concerns for their children. The…
Operating in Yemen is a challenge due to rapid changes in the context, with a multi-layered conflict involving an increasing number of actors whose positions and interests can shift dramatically and at short notice. In fast-moving contexts such as Yemen, aid organisations can struggle with conflict sensitivity, which they may see as hard to implement or not worth the effort. Agencies tend to focus on protecting their own staff and offices rather than pursuing other elements of security, such as acceptance (gaining popular support among target populations) and deterrence (deterring attacks through security guards). In Yemen, the preference for protection-oriented…
RSC Working Paper 103 August 2014   Two decades after the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, tens of thousands of refugees remain in exile in Uganda. Since October 2002, the governments of Rwanda and Uganda, and UNHCR have been playing an active role in promoting the voluntary repatriation of Rwandan refugees. However, despite these attempts to return the post-genocide Rwandan refugees to their ‘homeland’, considerable numbers are reluctant to return. This paper critically analyses the role of social networks in the repatriation of Rwandan refugees with a focus on those living in Nakivale and Oruchinga settlements in south-western Uganda. The paper…
As in previous years, the annual Aid Worker Security Database (AWSD) report has been launched today on World Humanitarian Day. The year 2013 set a new record for violence against civilian aid operations, with 251 separate attacks affecting 460 aid workers. The report, Unsafe Passage: Road attacks and their impact on humanitarian operations, provides the latest verified data on attacks against aid operations, and focuses on the particular security challenge of road travel.   The Aid Worker Security Database is a project of Humanitarian Outcomes. The AWSD research team welcomes feedback and comments on the report.
Launch of the book ‘Aid in Danger’ - Tuesday 19 August, ODI   Aid in danger: Violence against aid workers and the future of humanitarianism   19 August 2014, 14:00-15:30 - Overseas Development Institute (ODI), 203 Blackfriars Rd, SE1 8NJ London To register for this event and attend either in person or online, please follow this link: http://www.odi.org/events/3992-aid-danger-violence-against-aid-workers-future-humanitarianism   EISF and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) are pleased to invite you to the launch of 'Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism' by Larissa Fast—a hard look at violent attacks against aid workers on the frontlines of humanitarian crises. Based on…
EISF new briefing paper Security Risk Management and Religion: Faith and secularism in humanitarian assistance examines the impact that religion has on security risk management for humanitarian agencies,and considers whether a better understanding of religion can improve the security of organisations and individuals in the field. This paper gives an overview of the role of religion in humanitarian assistance, and its historical antecedents, and also studies how religion (and secularism) can impact and influence the identity of an organisation and the values, beliefs and practices of staff and partner agencies. The study examines differing opinions, approaches and vulnerabilities between secular…
Launch of EISF Report - Tuesday 8 July, King's College London Humanitarian action in Fragile Contexts: New actors in the Humanitarian Space Tuesday July 8, 2014 – 17h30 BST at King’s College London, Nash Lecture Theatre, Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS To register for this event, please contact Raquel Vazquez eisf-research@eisf.eu   EISF and the Humanitarian Futures Programme are pleased to invite you to a discussion on the key findings of our recent report The Future of Humanitarian Security in Fragile Contexts: An analysis of transformational factors affecting humanitarian action. The transformation of the humanitarian landscape has already made a significant impact on the security risk management…
ICRC’s Customary IHL database includes an update of State practice of 11 countries relating to armed conflicts and humanitarian issues such as the principles of distinction, proportionality and precautions in attack, the recruitment and use of child soldiers in hostilities, sexual violence, the treatment and material conditions of detention of persons deprived of liberty in relation to armed conflict, violence aimed at spreading terror among the civilian population, access for humanitarian relief to civilians in need, the protection of medical personnel and transport and of hospitals and hospital zones, the improper use of internationally recognized emblems, the integration of IHL…
After three decades of bitter conflict, humanitarian operations in Afghanistan remain fraught with difficulties and risks. In the early days of the conflict, humanitarian organisations worked in Kandahar and elsewhere in the south with much freedom of movement. However, the death of an International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) water engineer travelling between Kandahar and Uruzgan in March 2003 signalled a sea change in operational security and humanitarian access in the south, and perhaps Afghanistan as a whole. Conflict intensified over the decade that followed, and security incidents affecting NGOs (mostly at the hands of the armed opposition) increased…
 There are more than 45 million displaced people in the world, 80% of them women and children.[1] Disasters, natural and manmade, typically destroy medical facilities, displace medical personnel and erode support structures. In these circumstances an unplanned pregnancy can be fatal, and between a quarter and a half of maternal deaths in crisis situations are due to complications from unsafe abortions.[2] Family planning and post-abortion care are proven, essential and cost-effective interventions that save women's lives.[3] Nonetheless, they have been long neglected in emergencies in favour of conventional priorities such as water, sanitation, shelter, basic healthcare and food. This article…
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