Humanitarian Exchange articles tagged:Climate Change

During 2010, a group of humanitarian agencies in Bolivia came together to work on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). Over the past year, these agencies have shared learning, built a common DRR/climate change approach and developed RAPP, a consolidated Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis (CVA) tool. Having a locally developed common approach to DRR and interagency tools provides a practical way for agencies to work together with communities on huge climate issues that are too big for any one organisation to tackle alone. Funding has also been received from ECHO to enable three agencies (Plan International, Save the Children and World Vision)…
Almost a billion people are food insecure, most of them in developing countries. Food insecurity is compounded by climate change, which is predicted to make natural disasters such as drought and flooding more frequent and severe, in addition to making weather more erratic generally. Communities engaged in small-scale agriculture are particularly vulnerable to these trends. Preventative investments in disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation and resilience can minimise damage while enhancing food security. However, persuading donors and governments to make preventative investments can be difficult. To help address this gap, Tearfund conducted a community-based cost–benefit analysis of a…
The conflict in Darfur has greatly accelerated the processes of environmental degradation that have been undermining subsistence livelihoods in the area over recent decades. The implication of this is that environmental drivers of conflict have worsened as a result of the current crisis. An understanding of the physical and social processes involved must inform humanitarian programming, recovery planning and peace processes at local and national level so that this accelerated environmental degradation may be slowed and its impacts mitigated. The debate over the environment in Darfur illustrates the complexity of a conflict that has numerous levels. The lowest level of…
Climate change is projected to increase the likelihood and severity of a wide range of extreme weather events, many of which particularly affect urban area. Given urban areas’ high population densities, often including high concentrations of vulnerable people, increasing urban disaster risk should be a key concern in discussions of the adverse impacts of climate change.  This article presents two specific examples of increasing risks due to climate change in urban environments, and illustrates how Red Cross/Red Crescent societies address these concerns. The first case is the increasing risk of heat waves, illustrated by the 2003 heat wave in Western…
Natural disasters and conflicts derail agricultural development. Droughts and floods level crops and kill livestock; wars damage the infrastructure, social networks and human capital needed to get inputs to farms, and outputs to markets. Is research a priority when farmers’ needs are obvious and urgent? This article examines how the 15 international agricultural research centres of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR, www.cgiar.org) are addressing this question. What is the CGIAR? The CGIAR’s non-profit, apolitical centres are sponsored by the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). They are…
Kobe, Japan, was the venue for the World Conference on Disaster Reduction between 18 and 22 January 2005. Ten years ago, the city suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in modern history. Today, all has been rebuilt. A few of the older buildings still have cracks, and not everyone has yet recovered from the trauma and the loss of homes and livelihoods. But the real impact of Kobe is how it has transformed itself. Science, civil society, local government, the corporate sector and national government came together ten years ago and have worked together since to create an impressive…
The people of Bangladesh’s chars are acutely vulnerable to disasters, yet they are the least visible and most marginalised within the national warning and shelter system. Bangladesh’s off-shore chars (flat silt islands just a metre above sea level) are home to tens of thousands of people, many of whom have migrated there after losing houses and assets to river erosion elsewhere in the country. Life is extremely vulnerable to recurring disaster in the form of cyclones, storms and tidal surges. This physical vulnerability is compounded by social and economic systems that leave most inhabitants landless and debt-ridden. Hence, in these…

Find an Issue

Standard Login